independence

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on caring, choice, debt, economics, government, happiness, independence, labor, liberty, and people

I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on caring, choice, debt, economics, government, happiness, independence, labor, liberty, and people

To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must take our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we run into such debts, we must be taxed in our meat and drink, in our necessities and in our comforts, in our labors and in our amusements. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labor of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Sydney J. Harris on admiration, independence, and judgment

The truest test of independent judgment is being able to dislike someone who admires us, and to admire someone who dislikes us.

Sydney J. Harris (1917 - 1986)

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A Quote by Susan Brownell Anthony on feeling, independence, self-reliance, women, and world

Bicycling has done more to emancipate women than any one thing in the world. It gives her a feeling of self-reliance and independence the moment she takes her seat; and away she goes, the picture of untrammelled womanhood.

Susan B. Anthony (1820 - 1906)

Source: Speech, 1896; in Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, ch. 46, by Ida Husted Harper, 1989.

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A Quote by Supreme Court on action, certainty, clarity, congress, discretion, experience, failure, government, improvement, independence, judgment, novelty, and politics

Federal commandeering of state governments is such a novel phenomenon that this Court's first experience with it did not occur until the 1970's....later opinions of ours have made clear that the Federal Government may not compel the States to implement, by legislation or executive action, federal regulatory programs....Even assuming, moreover, that the Brady Act leaves no "policymaking" discretion with the States, we fail to see how that improves rather than worsens the intrusion upon state sovereignty. Preservation of the States as independent and autonomous political entities is arguably less undermined by requiring them to make policy in certain fields than (as Judge Sneed aptly described it over two decades ago) by "reducing them to puppets of a ventriloquist Congress."

Supreme Court

Source: U.S. Supreme Court, 1997, Printz v. United States[Interior clarifications omitted]

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A Quote by Stephen L. Richards on achievement, alienation, authors, certainty, constitution, daughters, divinity, eternity, exercise, fatherhood, fighting, gifts, god, good, history, independence, laws, liberty, men, nobility, principles, slavery, sons,

I have read and heard a good many statements by eminent writers and speakers to the effect that our liberty of which we are justly proud is an achievement, and not a gift. In the sense that it had to be worked for, fought for, and preserved with vigilance these statements are true. But let it never be forgotten that our concept of liberty is a gift. No human is the author of that concept. Many great men have so recognized it as did Thomas Jefferson when he wrote the Declaration of Independence and declared that "men are endowed with certain inalienable rights." Why are these rights inalienable? Because men did not create the right to liberty! In the exercise of his free agency he may surrender his privileges, and his property, and he may become the slave of others or of the state, but his free agency is as native to him as the air he breathes. It is part and parcel of his eternal constitution, and Jefferson was "righter than I think he himself knew" when he declared it an endowment which cannot be alienated. The message which we bear affirms that God is the Author of our inalienable liberty; that men, all men are of noble lineage, sons and daughters of the Eternal Father; and that liberty is their birthright. I thank God that . . . noble men were blessed with this lofty concept of man's inherent right to liberty and that they were prompted to incorporate these divine principles in the organic law and history of our favored land.

Stephen L. Richards (1879 - 1959)

Source: Ensign, November 1947.

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A Quote by Sigmund Freud on aggression, culture, independence, instinct, and obstacles

The tendency of aggression is an innate, independent, instinctual disposition in man . . . it constitutes the most powerful obstacle to culture.

Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939)

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A Quote by Shelley Winters on independence, intelligence, women, and words

I am the modern, intelligent, independent-type woman. In other words, a girl who can not get a man.

Shelley Winters (1920 -)

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A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on fighting, freedom, goals, happiness, independence, liberty, life, mistakes, and revolution

Make no mistake; the American Revolution was not fought to obtain freedom, but to preserve the liberties that Americans already had as colonials. Independence was no conscious goal, secretly nurtured in cellar or jungle by bearded conspirators, but a reluctant last resort, to preserve "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness."

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 12

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A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on america, day, delay, discovery, independence, and war

If the European discovery had been delayed for a century or two, it is possible that the Aztec in Mexico or the Iroquois in North America would have established strong native states capable of adopting European war tactics and maintaining their independence to this day, as Japan kept her independence from China.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

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