indecision

A Quote by Hugh Prather on fear, frustration, good, indecision, needs, present, and words

Fears, indecision, and frustration feed on words. Without words they usually stop. . . . Words are at times good for looking back, but they are confining when I need to act in the present.

Hugh Prather

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by H. A. Hopf on acceptance, action, business, decisions, dependence, facts, habits, indecision, responsibility, and risk

Indecision is debilitating; it feeds upon itself; it is, one might almost say, habit-forming. Not only that, but it is contagious; it transmits itself to others. . . . Business is dependent upon action. It cannot go forward by hesitation. Those in executive positions must fortify themselves with facts and accept responsibility for decisions based upon them. Often greater risk is involved in postponement than in making a wrong decision.

H. A. Hopf

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Gordon Graham on decisions, indecision, and tears

Decision is a sharp knife that cuts clean and straight; indecision, a dull one that hacks and tears and leaves ragged edges behind it.

Gordon Graham

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Herbert Walker Bush on indecision and people

People say I'm indecisive, but I don't know about that.

George H.W. Bush (1924 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by C. Smith Sumner on ability, automobiles, beauty, boldness, children, confusion, danger, environment, fatherhood, garden, god, indecision, life, pollution, and sharing

The Bee Story I want to share something with you. A few days ago, I was stopped at a large, busy intersection waiting for a long light. Not really looking at anything in particular, my eyes moved about until I noticed a honey bee on the street alongside the car. It was near a bold white line which was between my lane and the left turn lane. The bee was not flying in a lush garden among beautiful flowers and shrubs and trees, in the cool clean air with quietness and beauty all around it. Instead, it had lowered itself to walk on the hot pavement surrounded by noise, pollution, heat and great threats to its very life. It crawled onto the line and seemed to be pulled toward the other side. But then it resisted and wandered back. Back and forth it went, indecisive about whether it would cross over or not. The traffic was now moving in the left turn lane and presented a grave danger. Finally the little bee, perhaps confused, being in an environment to which it was not accustomed, and not using the abilities that God had given it, drifted over the line and headed directly into foreign territory. Two tires went by quickly without harming the bee although ruffling its wings a bit. It could see that it could stand up to any danger so it carried on. Then came a bus and, in a split second, its life was snuffed out. It perished on the wrong side of the line. This is a true story about one unfortunate bee. It has been acted out, set in different environments, in the lives of many of the children of our Heavenly Father.

C. Smith Sumner (1933 -)

Source: originally told to a seminary class, September, 19, Los Altos, California, 1983

Contributed by: Zaady

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