inaction

A Quote by Leonardo da Vinci on inaction, mind, purity, water, and weather

Iron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind.

Leonardo da Vinci (1452 - 1519)

Source: The Notebooks, 1508–1518

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Mackintosh on discipline and inaction

Disciplined inaction.

James Mackintosh (1765 - 1832)

Source: History of the Revolution in England in 1688, 1834. see Hall

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Isaac Asimov on conflict, existence, inaction, and laws

One, a robot may not injure a human being, or through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm; Two, a robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law; Three, a robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.

Isaac Asimov (1920 - 1992)

Source: Laws of Robotics from I. Robot, 1950

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Haile Selassie on evil, history, inaction, indifference, justice, and silence

Throughout history it has been the inaction of those who could have acted, the indifference of those who should have known better, the silence of the voice of justice when it mattered most, that has made it possible for evil to triumph.

Haile Selassie

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by General George Smith Patton, Jr. on body, inaction, and mind

An active mind cannot exist in an inactive body.

George Patton (1885 - 1945)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George H. Allen on inaction, mind, purity, water, and weather

Iron rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigors of the mind.

George H. Allen (1922 - 1990)

Source: see Leonardo da Vinci

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on belief, diligence, fashion, inaction, men, names, nature, observation, philosophy, reason, understanding, and words

But the idols of the Market Place are the most troublesome of all: idols which have crept into the understanding through their alliances with words and names. For men believe that their reason governs words. But words turn and twist the understanding. This it is that has rendered philosophy and the sciences inactive. Words are mostly cut to the common fashion and draw the distinctions which are most obvious to the common understanding. Whenever an understanding of greater acuteness or more diligent observation would alter those lines to suit the true distinctions of nature, words complain.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on action, concern, emptiness, inaction, joy, quiet, sage, silence, stillness, and study

The non-action of the wise man is not inaction. It is not studied. It is not shaken by anything. The sage is quiet because he is not moved, not because he wills to be quiet. . . . Joy does all things without concern. For emptiness, stillness, tranquillity, tastelessness, silence, and non-action are the root of all things.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 13:1, pp. 119, 121

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Caleb Colton on devil, evil, idleness, inaction, men, proverbs, and temptation

From its very inaction, idleness ultimately becomes the most active cause of evil; as a palsy is more to be dreaded than a fever. The Turks have a proverb which says that the devil tempts all other men, but that idle men tempt the devil.

Charles Colton (c.1780 - 1832)

Source: wrote Lacon,,2 volumes of aphorisms

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bhagavad-Gita on action, inaction, reward, and work

You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of the work. You should never engage in action for the sake of reward, nor should you long for inaction.

Bhagavad-Gita

Source: The Bhagavad-Gita: 2:47, p. 66

Contributed by: Zaady

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