impatience

A Quote by Charles Caleb Colton on patience, weakness, strength, and impatience

Patience is the support of weakness; impatience the ruin of strength.

Charles Colton (c.1780 - 1832)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Kate Chopin on impatience

She wanted something to happen - something, anything; she did not know what.

Kate Chopin

Source: The Awakening

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Jean Toomer, poet and novelist on faults, anger, and impatience

Thank everyone who calls out your faults, your anger, your impatience, your
egotism; do this consciously, voluntarily.
-Jean Toomer, poet and novelist
(1894-1967)

Jean Toomer, poet and novelist

Source: My diary

Contributed by: jagadish

A Quote by unknown on strength, asking, help, impatience, struggle, and joy

A little boy was having difficulty lifting a heavy stone.
His father came along just then.

Noting the boy's failure, he asked, "Are you using all your strength?"

"Yes, I am," the little boy said impatiently.

"No, you are not," the father answered. "I am right here just waiting, and you haven't asked me to help you."

unknown

Source: Author Unknown

Contributed by: Marianne

A Quote by Viktor Schauberger on water, monopoly, balance, war, hatred, impatience, discord, science, feminine, earth, mother earth, and gaia

The revelation of the secret of water will put an end to all manner of speculation or expediency and their excrescences, to which belong war, hatred, impatience and discord of every kind. The thorough study of water therefore signifies the end of monopolies, the end of all domination in the truest sense of the word and the start of a socialism arising from the development of individualism in its most perfect form. (1939)

Viktor Schauberger

Source: The Water Wizard: The Extraordinary Properties of Natural Water, Pages: 19

Contributed by: esaruoho

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, death, duty, earth, fatherhood, faults, grief, heart, heaven, impatience, losing, love, mind, nature, nobility, obligation, reason, simplicity, sons, sorrow, understanding, vulgarity, and world

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet, To give these mourning duties to your father: But, you must know, your father lost a father; That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound In filial obligation for some term To do obsequious sorrow: but to persever In obstinate condolement is a course Of impious stubbornness; 'tis unmanly grief; It shows a will most incorrect to heaven, A heart unfortified, a mind impatient, An understanding simple and unschool'd: For what we know must be and is as common As any the most vulgar thing to sense, Why should we in our peevish opposition Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature, To reason most absurd: whose common theme Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried, From the first corse till he that died to-day, 'This must be so.' We pray you, throw to earth This unprevailing woe, and think of us As of a father: for let the world take note, You are the most immediate to our throne; And with no less nobility of love Than that which dearest father bears his son, Do I impart toward you.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wystan Hugh Auden on impatience and paradise

Perhaps there is only one cardinal sin: impatience. Because of impatience we were driven out of Paradise, because of impatience we cannot return.

W.H. Auden (1907 - 1973)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on anger, arrogance, confusion, darkness, depression, doubt, fear, impatience, jealousy, pessimism, selfishness, unhappiness, and words

Words That Encourage Darkness and The Adversary: Angry, Antagonistic, Appetites, Arrogant, Confused, Contention, Covetous, Critical, Depressed, Domineering, Doubt, Easily Offended, Evasive, Fear, Frustrated, Harshness, Impatience, Ineffective, Irritable, Jealousy, Negative, Pessimistic, Possessive, Resentful, Secretive, Self-C entered, Selfish, Troubled, Uncontrolled, Unhappy, Vindictive,

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on belief, determination, impatience, mind, patience, planning, projects, and time

You may have great plans and may be impatient to carry them out now. Possibly you can. We usually can do far more than we have believed. But possibly the best time has not arrived and the best place selected. Then be patient while you persevere. Great things require time, and the important projects must pass through many stages. However, if you are determined to accomplish what you have in mind, and do your utmost as well as give yourself the required time, you will certainly do it. All things come to him who waits patiently while he works efficiently.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, civilization, community, conflict, conquest, day, debt, humanity, idleness, impatience, interest, judgment, mankind, morality, nations, needs, rudeness, rules, sentimentality, stability, success, war, and world

Theodore Roosevelt, impatient with the excesses of "purely sentimental historians," authored his own stirring vindication of America's relations with the Indians: Looked at from the standpoint of the ultimate result, there was little real difference to the Indian whether the land was taken by treaty or by war. . . . No treaty could be satisfactory to the whites, no treaty served the needs of humanity and civilization, unless it gave the land to the Americans as unreservedly as any successful war. Whether the whites won the land by treaty, by armed conflict, or, as was actually the case, by a mixture of both, mattered comparatively little so long as the land was won. It was all-important that it should be won, for the benefit of civilization and in the interests of mankind. It is, indeed, a warped, perverse, and silly morality which would forbid a course of conquest that has turned whole continents into the seats of mighty and flourishing civilized nations. . . . It is as idle to apply to savages the rules of international morality which obtain between stable and cultured communities, as it would be to judge the fifth-century English conquest of Britain by the standards of to-day. The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. . . . It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: The Winning of the West: Book IV, 1896

Contributed by: Zaady

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