imagination

A Quote by Ezra Taft Benson on blessings, foolishness, god, goodness, imagination, nations, needs, prayer, pride, virtue, and wisdom

Many of us have a tendency to forget the Gracious Hand which has preserved our nation, enriched it, strengthened it. Many of us imagine in the foolishness of pride, that our manifold blessings are due not to God's goodness, but to our own wisdom and virtue. Too many of us have been so drunk with self-sufficiency as no longer to feel the need of prayer.

Ezra Taft Benson (1899 - 1994)

Source: Title of Liberty, p. 156.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on adventure, fear, hell, home, imagination, learning, lies, love, men, and weakness

Better mendacities Than the classics in paraphrase! Some quick to arm, some for adventure, some from fear of weakness, some from fear of censure, some for love of slaughter, in imagination, learning later . . . some in fear, learning love of slaughter; Died some, pro patria, non "dulce" non "et decor" . walked eye-deep in hell believing in old men's lies, the unbelieving came home, home to a lie.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Hugh Selwyn Mauberley. E.P. Ode pour l’élection de son sepulchre, 1920, IV

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A Quote by Ernest Hemingway on ability, cowardice, and imagination

Cowardice, as distinguished from panic, is almost always simply a lack of ability to suspend the functioning of the imagination.

Ernest Hemingway (1898 - 1961)

Source: Men at War

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emile Coue on conflict, day, and imagination

When the imagination and the will are in conflict, the imagination invariably gains the day.

Emile Coue

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elaine Christensen on choice, darkness, earth, garden, imagination, immortality, life, loneliness, motherhood, posterity, promises, soul, water, wilderness, and women

EDEN We had no childhood, Eve and I. Eden was our mother's breast. Our lullaby was earth's first whimperings as grass and herb bloomed seasonless. I named them blade, by stem, by stalk in loneliness, before the Gods formed woman from my rib of dust. The garden was our womb: to nurture flesh, acknowledge bone, mold our souls in clay. We found our eyes, we heard our mouths, we filled each nostril full of sky, fingers tasted water, hands touched naked skin, bare as the fish in the four rivers, smooth as the serpent, who walked on subtle feet beneath the one tree, given and forbidden. We were pretenders, Eve and I, beneath its leaves of black and white. We played at being Gods below its fruit-filled limbs, imagined our posterity, and in the shade of its dark promise, we dreamed of immortality. Eden was our childhood, lived before the wilderness, before the curse, before Cherubim. And the Gods knew it was a garden like everyman's filled with only one choice.

Elaine Christensen (1948 -)

Source: At the Edges, published by the Utah State Poetry Society, 1990

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward O. Sisson on body, careers, certainty, character, culture, day, direction, dreams, education, excellence, exercise, existence, generosity, guidance, heart, home, honor, humanity, idealism, ideas, imagination, influence, inspiration, kin

"What sort of man or woman shall I be; what kind of life shall I propose and hew out ?" The answer one frames to this question is his personal ideal, and will exercise a potent influence upon the development of his character and the direction of his conduct. Toward it the growing soul strives, day after day, year after year; its outlines, first existing only in the imagination of the heart, gradually, almost imperceptibly impress themselves on the soul and body, and manifest themselves in the outer life; "As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he." The personal ideal distinguishes man from lower creatures; and its perfection and power mark the high and full development of humanity. Very early it becomes the directing influence in self-culture,-which is by far the most important part of education; all truly higher education is self-education; the mission of all training from without is to stimulate and aid and guide one to take charge of his own culture and career. Conscious education is always directed by some sort of an ideal: the school, the home, national education are laboring to mold men and women into certain general forms of excellence and virtue; the personal ideal is the image that one forms of his own possible self. The personal ideal must have power over our lives, else it is not an ideal at all, but only an idea. One must not merely dream of strength, of wisdom, of skill and power, of honor and righteousness, of nobility and generosity, - he must resolve to attain them. He must see himself pursuing and achieving, and be inspired and energized by the vision. Such a vision of power is the personal ideal.

Edward O. Sisson

Source: The Essentials of Character, The Macmillan Company, 1915

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward Kasner on common sense, imagination, intuition, mathematics, and science

Mathematics is often erroneously referred to as the science of common sense. Actually, it may transcend common sense and go beyond either imagination or intuition. It has become a very strange and perhaps frightening subject from the ordinary point of view, but anyone who penetrates into it will find a veritable fairyland, a fairyland which is strange, but makes sense, if not common sense.

Edward Kasner

Source: E. Kasner and J. Newman, Mathematics and the Imagination, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1940.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edmund Burke on ability, doctors, execution, imagination, leisure, meditation, military, nature, peace, planning, politics, society, study, time, and war

"War," says Machiavelli, "ought to be the only study of a prince;" and by a prince he means every sort of state, however constituted. "He ought," says this great political doctor, "to consider peace only as a breathing-time, which gives him leisure to contrive, and furnishes ability to execute military plans. "A meditation on the conduct of political societies made old Hobbes imagine that war was the state of nature.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: A Vindication of Natural Society. Vol. i. p. 15.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on imagination and silence

Because half a dozen grasshoppers under a fern make the field ring with their importunate chink, whilst thousands of great cattle, reposed beneath the shadow of the British oak, chew the cud and are silent, pray, to not imagine that those who make the noise are the only inhabitants of the field; that, of course, they are many in number; or that, after all, they are other than the little, shriveled, meagre, hopping, though loud and troublesome insects of the hour.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France.Vol. iii. P. 344.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on fiction, imagination, inventions, and truth

Fiction lags after truth, invention is unfruitful, and imagination cold and barren.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. P. 116.

Contributed by: Zaady

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