humanity

A Quote by Paulo Coelho on history, generations, progress, humanity, slavery, wage slaves, advancement, questions, and evolution

Thousands of years ago, weren't we capable of building enormous structures like the pyramids?  Weren't we capable of worshiping gods, weaving, making fire, finding lovers and wives, sending written messages?  Of course we were.  But although we've succeeded in replacing slaves with wage slaves, all the advances we've made have been in the field of science.  Human beings are still asking the same questions as their ancestors.  In short, they haven't evolved at all.

Paulo Coelho

Source: The Witch of Portobello, Pages: 217

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Buckminster Fuller on problems, self, humanity, and purpose

What is common to all human beings in all history is problems, problems, problems. We are here for problem-solving and, if you are any good at problem-solving, you don't come to utopia, you come to more difficult problems to solve. That apparently is what we're here for, so I therefore conclude that we humans are here for local information-gathering and local problem-solving with our minds having access to the design principles of the Universe. We are here for local information gathering and local-Universe problem-solving in support of the integrity of eternally regenerative Universe. That is a very extraordinary and important kind of a function we have.

Buckminster Fuller

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on humanity, respect, honor, and reality

Let us treat men and women well; treat them as if they were real.
Perhaps they are.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Pema Chodron on humanity, loneliness, life, and belonging

Better to join in with humanity than to set ourselves apart.

Pema Chodron

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by David Abram on technology, civilization, earth, humanity, economy, ecology, and diversity

We align ourselves not with the ever-expanding human monoculture, nor with the abstract vision of a global economy, but with the far more sustainable prospect of a regionally diverse and interdependent web of largely self-sufficient communities – a multiplicity of technologically sophisticated, vernacular cultures tuned to the structure and pulse of particular places. We know well that if humankind is to flourish without destroying the living world that sustains us, then we must grow out of our adolescent aspiration to encompass and control all that is. Sooner or later, we know, our technological ambition will begin to scale itself down, allowing itself to be oriented by the distinct needs of specific bioregions. Sooner or later, that is, technological civilization will accept the invitation of gravity and settle back into the land, its political and economic structures diversifying into the varied contours and rhythms of a more-than-human earth.

David Abram

Source: The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World (Vintage), Pages: 272

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by David Abram on experience, relationship, earth, environment, humanity, presence, and life

To describe the animate life of particular things is simply the most precise and parsimonious way to articulate the things as we spontaneously experience them, prior to all our conceptualizations and definitions.

Our most immediate experience of things is necessarily an experience of reciprocal encounter – of tension, communication, and commingling. From within the depths of this encounter, we know the thing or phenomenon only as our interlocutor – as a dynamic presence that that confronts us and draws us into relation. We conceptually immobilize or objectify the phenomenon only by mentally absenting ourselves from this relation, by forgetting or repressing our sensuous involvement. To define another being as an inert or passive object is to deny its ability to actively engage us and to provoke our senses; we thus block our perceptual reciprocity with that being. By linguistically defining the surrounding world as a determinate set of objects, we cut our conscious, speaking selves off from the spontaneous life of our sensing bodies.

If, on the other hand, we wish to describe a particular phenomenon without repressing our direct experience, then we cannot avoid speaking of the phenomenon as an active, animate entity with which we find ourselves engaged. To the sensing body, no thing presents itself as utterly passive or inert. Only by affirming the animateness of perceived things do we allow our words to emerge directly from the depths of our ongoing reciprocity with the world.

David Abram

Source: The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World (Vintage), Pages: 56

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by David Abram on ecology, environment, life, land, wolves, voices, humanity, community, and earth

Caught up in a mass of abstractions, our attention hypnotized by a host of human-made technologies that only reflect us back to ourselves, it is all too easy for us to forget our carnal inherence in a more-than-human matrix of sensations and sensibilities. Our bodies have formed themselves in delicate reciprocity with the manifold textures, sounds, and shapes of an animate earth – our eyes have evolved in subtle interaction with other eyes, as our ears are attuned by their very structure to the howling of wolves and the honking of geese. To shut ourselves off from these other voices, to continue by our lifestyles to condemn these other sensibilities to the oblivion of extinction, is to rob our own senses of their integrity, and to rob our minds of their coherence. We are human only in contact, and conviviality, with what is not human.

David Abram

Source: The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World (Vintage), Pages: 22

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by David Abram on intellect, reason, humanity, earth, and animals

Does the human intellect, or “reason,” really spring us free from our inherence in the depths of this wild proliferation of forms? Or on the contrary, is the human intellect rooted in, and secretly borne by, our forgotten contact with the multiple nonhuman shapes that surround us on every hand?

David Abram

Source: The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World (Vintage), Pages: 49

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Edmund J Bourne on story, global shift, soul, environment, earth, perception, humanity, and future

Humanity is looking for a new story. The one it has embraced since the Renaissance is no longer viable. Despite all of its positive contributions to modern life, three hundred years of scientific-technological development has left our civilization in an untenable position--at odds with its natural environment and ultimately its own deeper, collective, soul. Only a global shift in fundamental perceptions, values, and corresponding actions will allow human-kind to resume an evolutionary pat in alignment with nature and the larger cosmos.

Edmund Bourne

Source: Global Shift: How A New Worldview Is Transforming Humanity (New Harbinger/Noetic Books), Pages: 1

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by David Simon on earth, growth, development, boundaries, and humanity

I've never met anyone with a perfect upbringing. It seems to me that life on planet Earth just doesn't work that way. The basic challenges of getting our needs met and managing boundaries are inherent in growing up human.

David Simon

Source: Free to Love, Free to Heal: Heal Your Body by Healing Your Emotions, Pages: 13

Contributed by: Siona

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