honor

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on citizenship, country, difficulty, earth, freedom, generations, giving, history, honor, hope, past, power, quiet, responsibility, slavery, present, and world

The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country. Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history. No personal significance or insignificance can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down in honor or dishonor to the latest generation. We say we are for the Union. The world will not forget that we say this. We, even we here, hold the power and bear the responsibility. In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free - honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last best hope of earth.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Address to the Congress of the United States, Dec. 1, 1862

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on children, college, constitution, country, fatherhood, honor, independence, justice, laws, liberty, life, motherhood, nations, politics, posterity, prosperity, religion, revolution, sacred, schools, and support

Let every lover of liberty, every well-wisher to his posterity, swear by the blood of the revolution never to violate, in the least particular, the laws of the country and never to tolerate their violation by others. As the patriots of '76 did to the support of the declaration of independence, so to the support of the constitution and laws, let every American pledge his life, his prosperity and his sacred honor. Let every man remember that to violate the laws is to trample on the blood of his fathers and to tear the charter of his own and his children's liberty. Let reverence for the laws be breathed by every American mother to the lisping babe that prattles on her lap. Let it be taught in schools, in seminaries, and in colleges. Let it be preached from the pulpit, proclaimed in the legislative halls, and enforced in courts of justice. In short, let it become the political religion of the nation.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Words to remember, newspaper clipping, Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

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