honor

A Quote by Ernest Hemingway on art, danger, death, honor, and performance

Bullfighting is the only art in which the artist is in danger of death and in which the degree of brilliance in the performance is left to the fighter's honour.

Ernest Hemingway (1898 - 1961)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Eric Sevareid on danger, honor, humor, power, and world

Next to power without honor, the most dangerous thing in the world is power without humor.

Eric Sevareid (1912 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Dickinson on honor, life, wives, women, and work

She rose to his requirement, dropped The playthings of her life To take the honorable work Of woman and of wife.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

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A Quote by ElRay L. Christiansen on blessings, death, eternity, fatherhood, gifts, glory, guidance, honor, indifference, laws, life, mercy, merit, salvation, and time

So this estate is given each of us to determine whether or not we will merit glory and honor "for ever and ever," or whether we will rebel and refuse or be indifferent and not comply with the conditions and the laws and the ordinances provided by a merciful Father for our guidance through life and our protection and our salvation and thereby, by so doing, deny ourselves the fabulous gift and blessing of eternal life. This life, then, is a time of "sifting," a time when the "wheat" is separated from the "chaff," a time of deciding who is who and where we will live after we die.

ElRay L. Christiansen (1897 - 1975)

Source: at BYU, March 24, 1964, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

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A Quote by Edward O. Sisson on blush, caring, character, confusion, conscience, endurance, fear, friendship, good, heart, honor, learning, lies, life, love, reality, secrets, and soul

This sense of honor is the sense of right. It is the soul's instinctive love for the good, the true, the commendable, and its instinctive scorn of the base, mean, and vile. There is a confusion between that false honor which cares only what another thinks or says, and the true personal honor which cares first for what we are. It is too true that many a man who would resent with a blow the epithet of "thief" or "liar" will lie and steal in secret apparently without a qualm of conscience. The true root of honor demands reality and hates shams. One should be taught to abhor and reject in his own heart everything which he would resent in an accusation made by another. He should learn not to tolerate in his own inner consciousness what he would fear or blush to have known to friends or foes. This is the sense of personal honor that dominates and molds character and that endures the heaviest stress of life.

Edward O. Sisson

Source: The Essentials of Character, The Macmillan Company, 1915

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A Quote by Edward O. Sisson on body, careers, certainty, character, culture, day, direction, dreams, education, excellence, exercise, existence, generosity, guidance, heart, home, honor, humanity, idealism, ideas, imagination, influence, inspiration, kin

"What sort of man or woman shall I be; what kind of life shall I propose and hew out ?" The answer one frames to this question is his personal ideal, and will exercise a potent influence upon the development of his character and the direction of his conduct. Toward it the growing soul strives, day after day, year after year; its outlines, first existing only in the imagination of the heart, gradually, almost imperceptibly impress themselves on the soul and body, and manifest themselves in the outer life; "As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he." The personal ideal distinguishes man from lower creatures; and its perfection and power mark the high and full development of humanity. Very early it becomes the directing influence in self-culture,-which is by far the most important part of education; all truly higher education is self-education; the mission of all training from without is to stimulate and aid and guide one to take charge of his own culture and career. Conscious education is always directed by some sort of an ideal: the school, the home, national education are laboring to mold men and women into certain general forms of excellence and virtue; the personal ideal is the image that one forms of his own possible self. The personal ideal must have power over our lives, else it is not an ideal at all, but only an idea. One must not merely dream of strength, of wisdom, of skill and power, of honor and righteousness, of nobility and generosity, - he must resolve to attain them. He must see himself pursuing and achieving, and be inspired and energized by the vision. Such a vision of power is the personal ideal.

Edward O. Sisson

Source: The Essentials of Character, The Macmillan Company, 1915

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on age, beginning, chivalry, disaster, dreams, honor, insults, joy, justice, life, men, nations, thought, and vision

It is now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the Queen of France, then the Dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she hardly seemed to touch, a more delightful vision. I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in,-glittering like the morning star full of life and splendour and joy. . . . Little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her in a nation of gallant men,-in a nation of men of honour and of cavaliers. I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult. But the age of chivalry is gone; that of sophisters, economists, and calculators has succeeded.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. P. 331.

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A Quote by Edmund Burke on chastity and honor

That chastity of honour which felt a stain like a wound.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. P. 332.

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A Quote by Captain Edward "Eddie" Vernon Rickenbacker on business, good, honor, hospitality, quality, and survival

If a thing is old, it is a sign that it was fit to live. Old families, old customs, old styles survive because they are fit to survive. The guarantee of continuity is quality. Submerge the good in a flood of the new, and good will come back to join the good which the new brings with it. Old-fashioned hospitality, old-fashioned politeness, old-fashioned honor in business had qualities of survival. These will come back.

Eddie Rickenbacker (1890 - 1973)

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A Quote by David Oman McKay on assumptions, honor, sacred, and sons

Every partaker of the sacrament gives evidence of his willingness to assume three very great obligations, to which he becomes bound in sacred honor: • To take upon himself the name of the Son, • That he will always remember him, • To keep his commandments.

David McKay (1873 - 1970)

Source: Home Memories of Pres. D. O. McKay, p. 234.

Contributed by: Zaady

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