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A Quote by Arthur Milton on abuse, automobiles, desires, home, life, needs, practicality, and service

Life without credit would be horrid. Life with too much credit is worse than horrid - its a nightmare. Credit always costs. Whenever you say "charge it!" You are paying something more, in one way or another, than you would pay for the same item or service in cash. There is a plus to credit if one can use it wisely. For a home, for an automobile, for schooling, etc. But take care - don't abuse it. Stay well below "your desires." And pay off as quickly as you can. Take care of what you have and have as little as you really need. Buy "used" when practical. Make do with what you have until you can pay cash for consumable items.

Arthur Milton

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection,

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur Kudner on dawn, day, death, fear, home, hope, learning, life, love, names, peace, people, war, and words

Never fear big long words. Big long words mean little things. All big things have little names, Such as life and death, peace and war, Or dawn, day, night, hope, love, home. Learn to use little words in a big way. It is hard to do, But they say what you mean. When you don't know what you mean, Use big words That often fools little people.

Arthur Kudner

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur Buller on day, home, and relatives

There was a young lady named Bright, Whose speed was far faster than light: She set out one day In a relative way, And returned home the previous night.

Arthur Buller (1874 - 1944)

Source: Limerick in Punch, 19 Dec. 1923

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Artemis Ward on dreams, friendship, heart, home, and money

My friends, money is not all. It is not money that will mend a broken heart or reassemble the fragments of a dream. Money cannot brighten the hearth nor repair the portals of a shattered home. I refer, of course, to Confederate money.

Artemis Ward

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anita Brookner on conventionality, home, pity, and women

It will be a pity if women in the more conventional mould are to be phased out, for there will never be anyone to go home to.

Anita Brookner (1938 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on animals and home

MONKEY, n. An arboreal animal which makes itself at home in genealogical trees.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on beginning, charity, and home

CHARITY, n. a thing that begins at home and usually stays there.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alistair Cooke on acceptance, character, home, people, and theater

To watch an American on a beach or crowding into a subway, or buying a theater ticket, or sitting at home with his radio on, tells you something about one aspect of the American character: the capacity to withstand a great deal of outside interference, so to speak; a willing acceptance of frenzy which though it's never self-conscious, amounts o a willingness to let other people have and assert their own lively, and even offensive, character. They are a tough race in this.

Alistair Cooke (1908 -)

Source: One Man’s America

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Noyes on christmas, day, death, dreams, glory, gold, home, mountains, and songs

The Three Ships As I went up the mountain-side The sea below me glitter'd wide, And, Eastward, far away, I spied On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day, The three great ships that take the tide On Christmas Day in the morning. Ye have heard the song, how these must ply From the harbours of home to the ports o' the skyl Do ye dream none knoweth the whither and why On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day The three great ships go sailing by On Christmas Day in the morning? Yet, as I live, I never knew That ever a song could ring so true, Till I saw them break thro' a haze of blue On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And the marvellous ancient flags they flew On Christmas Day in the morning! From the heights above the belfried town I saw that the sails were patched and brown, But the 9ags were a-fiame with a great renown On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day, And on every mast was a golden crown On Christmas Day in the morning. Most marvellous ancient ships were these! Were their prows a-plunge to the Chersonese, For the pomp of Rome, or the glory of Greece, On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day? Were they out on a quest for the Golden Fleece On Christmas Day in the morning? The sun and the wind they told me there How goodly a load the three ships bear, For the first is gold and the second is myrrh On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And the third is frankincense most rare, On Christmas Day in the morning. They have mixed their shrouds with the golden sky, They have faded away where the last dreams die . . . Ah yet, will ye watch, when the mist lifts high On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day? Will ye see three ships come sailing by On Christmas Day in the morning?

Alfred Noyes (1880 - 1958)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Newton on confidence, happiness, home, life, love, and world

If this world affords true happiness, it is to be found in a home where love and confidence increase with the years, where the necessities of life come without severe strain, where luxuries enter only after their cost has been carefully considered.

Alfred Edward Newton (1863 - 1940)

Contributed by: Zaady

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