history

A Quote by André Malraux on america, conquest, effort, generations, history, energy, nations, power, and world

In the course of history, all empires have been created with premeditation, by an effort often sustained over several generations. Every power has been Roman to a degree. The United States is the first nation to become the most powerful in the world without having sought to be so. Its exceptional energy and organization have never been oriented toward conquest.

Andre Malraux (1901 - 1976)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ananda K. Coomaraswamy on art, history, independence, time, and work

We have come to think of art and work as incompatible, or at least independent categories and have for the first time in history created an industry without art.

Ananda K. Coomaraswamy (1877 -)

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A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on animals, fatherhood, history, motherhood, and science

ZOOLOGY, n. The science and history of the animal kingdom, including its king, the House Fly ("Musca maledicta"). The father of Zoology was Aristotle, as is universally conceded, but the name of its mother has not come down to us.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

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A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on belief, body, history, inventions, myth, and people

MYTHOLOGY, n. The body of a primitive people's beliefs concerning its origin, early history, heroes, deities and so forth, as distinguished from the true accounts which it invents later.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

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A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on history and soldiers

HISTORY, n. An account mostly false, of events mostly unimportant, which are brought about by rulers mostly knaves, and soldiers mostly fools.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

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A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on history, ideas, play, study, and thought

I will not go so far as to say that to construct a history of thought without profound study of the mathematical ideas of successive epochs is like omitting Hamlet from the play which is named after him. That would be claiming too much. But it is certainly analogous to cutting out the part of Ophelia. This simile is singularly exact. For Ophelia is quite essential to the play, she is very charming . . . and a little mad.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: W.H. Auden and L. Kronenberger The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.

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A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on history, learning, and men

That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Collected Essays, 1959

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A Quote by Albert Camus on correction, history, indifference, and misery

To correct a natural indifference I was placed half-way between misery and the sun. Misery kept me from believing that all was well under the sun, and the sun taught me that history wasn't everything.

Albert Camus (1913 - 1960)

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A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on history, observation, optimism, pessimism, philosophy, and world

I am not a pessimist but a pejorist (as George Eliot said she was not an optimist but a meliorist); and that philosophy is founded on my observation of the world, not on anything so trivial and irrelevant as personal history.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: AutobiographicaI note written for a French translation of his poems

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on belief, existence, history, presidency, promises, purpose, and slavery

Broken campaign promises are as old as the Presidency itself. Here the "Great Emancipator" makes an inaugural pledge that history would sooner forget. "I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so."

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: First Inaugural Address, 1861

Contributed by: Zaady

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