history

A Quote by Clarence Seward Darrow on history

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History repeats itself, and that's one of the things that's wrong with history.

Clarence Darrow (1857 - 1938)

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A Quote by Marcus Tullius Cicero on guidance, history, life, memory, reality, and time

History is the witness that testifies to the passing of time; it illumines reality, vitalizes memory, provides guidance in daily life, and brings us tidings of antiquity.

Cicero (106 - 43 BC)

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A Quote by Christopher Columbus on certainty, christianity, history, men, people, and women

The two Christians met on the way many people who were going to their towns, women and men, with a firebrand in the hand, [and] herbs to drink the smoke thereof, as they are accustomed. The first certain reference in history to smoking tobacco.

Christopher Columbus (1451 - 1506)

Source: Journal of the First Voyage, November 6, 1492

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A Quote by Charles Sumner on affliction, beginning, compromise, country, history, and human rights

From the beginning of our history the country has been afflicted with compromise. It is by compromise that human rights have been; abandoned.

Charles Sumner (1811 - 1874)

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A Quote by Charles Proteus Steinmetz on creativity, day, force, happiness, history, learning, men, people, power, scientists, spirituality, study, and world

Spiritual power is a force which history clearly teaches has been the greatest force in the development of men. Ye. we have been merely playing with it and never have really studied it as we have the physical forces. Some day people will learn that material things do not bring happiness, and are of little use in making people creative and powerful. Then the scientists of the world will turn their laboratories over to the study of spiritual forces which have hardly been scratched.

Charles Proteus Steinmetz (1865 - 1923)

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A Quote by Charles Percy Snow on atoms, authority, awards, clarity, direction, doubt, existence, good, history, laws, listening, mathematics, physics, proof, purity, satisfaction, scientists, simplicity, style, theory, thought, time, unity, and work

Einstein, twenty-six years old, only three years away from crude privation, still a patent examiner, published in the Annalen der Physik in 1905 five papers on entirely different subjects. Three of them were among the greatest in the history of physics. One, very simple, gave the quantum explanation of the photoelectric effect-it was this work for which, sixteen years later he was awarded the Nobel prize. Another dealt with the phenomenon of Brownian motion, the apparently erratic movement of tiny particles suspended in a liquid: Einstein showed that these movements satisfied a clear statistical law. This was like a conjuring trick, easy when explained: before it, decent scientists could still doubt the concrete existence of atoms and molecules: this paper was as near direct proof of their concreteness as a theoretician could give. The third paper was the special theory of relativity, which quietly amalgamated space, time and matter into one fundamental unity. This last paper contains no references and quotes no authority. All of them are written in a style unlike any other theoretical physicist's. They contain very little mathematics. There is a good deal of verbal commentary. The conclusions, the bizarre conclusions, emerge as though with the greatest of ease: the reasoning is unbreakable. It looks as though he had reached the conclusions by pure thought, unaided, without listening to the opinions of others. To a surprisingly large extent, that is precisely what he had done. It is pretty safe to say that, so long as physics lasts, no one will again hack out three major breakthroughs in one year.

Charles Percy Snow (1905 - 1980)

Source: C.P. Snow, Variety of Men, Penguin Books, Harmondsworth, U.K. 1969, pp 85-86.

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A Quote by Charles Macklin on history, justice, laws, people, science, uncertainty, and words

The law is a sort of hocus-pocus science, that smiles in yer face while it picks yer pocket; and the glorious uncertainty of it is of mair use to the professors than the justice of it. Hocus was an old cunning attorney. - Dr. John Arbuthnot, History of John Bull, 1712. The words of consecration, "Hoc est corpus," were travestied into a nickname for jugglery, as "Hocus-pocus." - John Richard Green, A Short History of the English People, 1874.

Charles Macklin (1697 - 1797)

Source: Love à la Mode. Act ii. Sc. 1.

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A Quote by Charles Lamb on books, fiction, history, and traditions

I like you and your book, ingenious Hone! In whose capacious all-embracing leaves The very marrow of tradition 's shown; And all that history, much that fiction weaves.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: To the Editor of the Every-Day Book.

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A Quote by Charles Franklin Kettering on history, philosophy, progress, thought, work, and world

Great steps in human progress are made by things that don't work the way philosophy thought they should. If things always worked the way they should, you could write the history of the world from now on. But they don't, and it is those deviations from the normal that make human progress.

Charles Kettering (1876 - 1958)

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A Quote by Charles Robert Darwin on animals, doubt, existence, facts, history, inventions, organize, and world

The plow is one of the most ancient and most valuable of man's inventions; but long before he existed the land was in fact regularly plowed, and still continues to be thus plowed by earthworms. It may be doubted whether there are many other animals which have played so important a part in the history of the world, as have these lowly organized creatures.

Charles Darwin (1809 - 1882)

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