history

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on acceptance, animals, belief, birth, church, familiarity, history, jesus, life, time, and traditions

Canon Farrar accepts the traditional belief that the shelter within which Jesus was born was that of one of the numerous limestone caves which abound in the region, and which are still used by travelers as resting places. He says: "In Palestine it not infrequently happens that the entire khan, or at any rate the portion of it in which the animals are housed, is one of those innumerable caves which abound in the limestone rocks of its central hills. Such seems to have been in the case at the little town of Bethlehem-Ephratah, in the land of Judah. Justin Martyr, the Apologist, who, from his birth at Shechem, was familiar with Palestine, and who lived less than a century after the time of our Lord, places the scene of the nativity in a cave. This is, indeed, the ancient and constant tradition both of the Eastern and the Western Churches, and it is one of the few to which, though unrecorded in the Gospel history, we may attach a reasonable probability."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, chapter 1, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.8, p.106

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on age, beginning, belief, children, christ, christianity, cities, death, dogs, earth, enemies, experience, fighting, friendship, generations, god, gold, history, hunger, kindness, lies, men, motherhood, people, prophet

Never was a narrative more full of horrors, frenzies, unspeakable degradations, and overwhelming miseries than is the history of the siege of Jerusalem. Never was any prophecy more closely, more terribly, more overwhelmingly fulfilled than this of Christ. The men going about in the disguise of women with swords concealed under their gay robes; the rival outrages and infamies of John and Simon; the priests struck by darts from the upper court of the Temple, and falling slain by their own sacrifices; 'the blood of all sorts of dead carcases - priests, strangers, profane - standing in lakes in the holy courts'; the corpses themselves lying in piles and mounds on the very altar slopes; the fires feeding luxuriously on cedar-work overlaid with gold: friend and foe trampled to death on the gleaming mosaics in promiscuous carnage: priests, swollen with hunger, leaping madly into the devouring flames, till at last those flames had done their work, and what had been the Temple of Jerusalem, the beautiful and holy House of God, was a heap of ghastly ruin, where the burning embers were half-slaked in pools of gore. And did not all the righteous blood shed upon the earth since the days of Abel come upon that generation? Did not many of that generation survive to witness and feel the unutterable horrors which Josephus tells? - to see their fellows crucified in jest "some one way, and some another," till "room was wanting for the crosses, and crosses for the carcases?" - to experience the "deep silence" and the kind of deadly night which seized upon the city in the intervals of rage? - to see 600,000 dead bodies carried out of the gates? -- to see friends fighting madly for grass and nettles, and the refuse of the drains? to see the bloody zealots "gaping for want, and stumbling and staggering along like mad dogs?" - to hear the horrid tale of the miserable mother who, in the pangs of famine, had devoured her own child? - to be sold for slaves in such multitudes that at last none would buy them? - to see the streets running with blood, and the "fire of burning houses quenched in the blood of their defenders?" - to have their young sons sold in hundreds, or exposed in the amphitheatres to the sword of the gladiator or the fury of the lion, until at last, "since the people were now slain, the Holy House burnt down, and the city in flames, there was nothing farther left for the enemy to do?" In that awful siege it is believed that there perished 1,100,000 men, besides the 97.000 who were carried captive, and most of whom perished subsequently in the arena or the mine; and it was an awful thing to feel, as some of the survivors and eyewitnesses - and they not Christians - did feel, that the city had deserved its overthrow by producing a generation of men who were the causes of its misfortunes;' and that "neither did any other city ever suffer such miseries, nor did any age ever breed a generation more fruitful in wickedness than this was, since the beginning of the world."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: The Life of Christ, pp. 572-73, quoted by Bruce R. McConkie, The Mortal Messiah, Vol.3, p.433-434.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on accuracy, certainty, difficulty, elderly, fatherhood, history, independence, judaism, labor, names, patience, and traditions

It is now almost certain that the genealogies in both Gospels are genealogies of Joseph, which if we may rely on early traditions of their consanguinity involve genealogies of Mary also. The Davidic descent of Mary is implied in Acts 2:30; 13:23; Rom. 1:3; Luke 1:32, etc. St. Matthew gives the legal descent of Joseph through the elder and regal line, as heir to the throne of David; St. Luke gives the natural descent. Thus, the real father of Salathiel was heir of the house of Nathan, but the childless Jeconiah (Jer. 22:30) was the last lineal representative of the elder kingly line. The omission of some obscure names and the symmetrical arrangement into tesseradecads were common Jewish customs. It is not too much to say that after the labors of Mill (on the Mythical Interpretation of the Gospels, pp. 147-217) and Lord A. C. Hervey (on the Genealogies of our Lord, 1853) scarcely a single difficulty remains in reconciling the apparent divergencies. And thus in this as in so many other instances, the very discrepancies which appear to be most irreconcilable, and most fatal to the historic accuracy of the four evangelists, turn out, on closer and more patient investigation, to be fresh proofs that they are not only entirely independent, but also entirely trustworthy.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, footnote p 27

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Fred Allen on age, comedy, competition, history, jokes, life, machines, and time

We are living in the machine age. For the first time in history the comedian has been compelled to supply himself with jokes and comedy material to compete with the machine. Whether he knows it or not, the comedian is on a treadmill to oblivion.

Fred Allen (1894 - 1956)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Franz Kafka on death, deed, history, and world

Death confronts us not unlike the historical battle scene that hangs on the wall of the classroom. It is our task to obscure or quite obliterate the picture by our deeds while we are still in this world.

Franz Kafka (1883 - 1924)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Francisco Franco on god, history, and responsibility

I am responsible only to God and history.

Francisco Franco

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Francis H. Cabot on beginning, garden, goals, history, imagination, and plants

Gardeners instinctively know that flowers and plants are a continuum and that the wheel of garden history will always be coming full circle. One lifetime is never enough to accomplish one's horticultural goals. If a garden is a site for the imagination, how can we be very far from the beginning?

Francis H. Cabot

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on business, garden, history, memory, men, mind, philosophy, power, science, and understanding

The men of experiment are like the ant, they only collect and use; the reasoners resemble spiders, who make cobwebs out of their own substance. But the bee takes the middle course: it gathers its material from the flowers of the garden and field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own. Not unlike this is the true business of philosophy (science); for it neither relies solely or chiefly on the powers of the mind, nor does it take the matter which it gathers from natural history and mechanical experiments and lay up in the memory whole, as it finds it, but lays it up in the understanding altered and digested. Therefore, from a closer and purer league between these two faculties, the experimental and the rational (such as has never been made), much may be hoped.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Francis Bacon, Novum Organum, Liberal Arts Press, Inc., NY, p 93.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Francis B. Sayre on defense, fighting, force, history, human rights, humanity, power, selfishness, and struggle

History down through the centuries has proved again and again that there can be but one outcome to a struggle for selfish power against forces fighting to protect and advance human rights. Those genuinely serving humanity always ultimately emerge triumphant. It is under their standards that the [Western] allies choose to throw in their lot for humanity's defense.

Francis B. Sayre

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Felix Frankfurter on history and liberty

The history of liberty has largely been the history of the observance of procedural safeguards.

Felix Frankfurter (1882 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

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