heaven

A Quote by William Shakespeare on heaven, truth, virtue, and words

As there comes light from heaven and words from breath, As there is sense in truth and truth in virtue,

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Measure for Measure, Act 5, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on god, heaven, ignorance, and knowledge

Ignorance is the curse of God, Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VI

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on heaven and path

Do not, as some ungracious pastors do, Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven, Whiles, like a puff'd and reckless libertine, Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads, And recks not his own rede. [counsel]

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art, change, day, earth, fate, fortune, friendship, heaven, hope, love, men, trouble, and wealth

When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state, And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself, and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Sonnet 29

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on corruption, heaven, and judgment

Heaven is above all yet; there sits a judge, That no king can corrupt.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VIII

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, death, duty, earth, fatherhood, faults, grief, heart, heaven, impatience, losing, love, mind, nature, nobility, obligation, reason, simplicity, sons, sorrow, understanding, vulgarity, and world

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet, To give these mourning duties to your father: But, you must know, your father lost a father; That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound In filial obligation for some term To do obsequious sorrow: but to persever In obstinate condolement is a course Of impious stubbornness; 'tis unmanly grief; It shows a will most incorrect to heaven, A heart unfortified, a mind impatient, An understanding simple and unschool'd: For what we know must be and is as common As any the most vulgar thing to sense, Why should we in our peevish opposition Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature, To reason most absurd: whose common theme Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried, From the first corse till he that died to-day, 'This must be so.' We pray you, throw to earth This unprevailing woe, and think of us As of a father: for let the world take note, You are the most immediate to our throne; And with no less nobility of love Than that which dearest father bears his son, Do I impart toward you.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art, heaven, and truth

'By heaven, that thou art fair, is most infallible; true, that thou art beauteous; truth itself, that thou art lovely. More fairer than fair, beautiful than beauteous, truer than truth itself, have commiseration on thy heroical vassal!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: LOVE'S Labours LOST, Act 4, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on excess, gold, and heaven

Therefore, to be possess'd with double pomp, To guard a title that was rich before, To gild refined gold, to paint the lily, To throw a perfume on the violet, To smooth the ice, or add another hue Unto the rainbow, or with taper-light To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish, Is wasteful and ridiculous excess.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King John, Act 4, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Law on god, heaven, hell, and power

The will is that which has all power; it makes heaven and it makes hell: for there is no hell but where the will of the creature is turned from God, nor any heaven but where the will of the creature worketh with God.

William Law (1686 - 1761)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Henry Drummond on beauty, birth, earth, eternity, fatherhood, food, glory, god, gold, good, heaven, joy, love, mankind, power, reason, salvation, songs, soul, truth, and world

Bright portals of the sky, Emboss'd with sparkling stars, Doors of eternity, With diamantine bars, Your arras rich uphold, Loose all your bolts and springs, Ope wide your leaves of gold, That in your roofs may come the King of Kings. O well-spring of this All! Thy Father's image vive; Word, that from nought did call What is, doth reason, live; The soul's eternal food, Earth's joy, delight of heaven; All truth, love, beauty, good: To thee, to thee be praises ever given! O glory of the heaven! O sole delight of earth! To thee all power be given, God's uncreated birth! Of mankind lover true, Indearer of his wrong, Who doth the world renew, Still be thou our salvation and our song!

William Henry Drummond (1854 - 1907)

Source: “Christmas Day”

Contributed by: Zaady

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