heaven

A Quote by William Shakespeare on heaven, lies, and remedies

Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,  Which we ascribe to heaven.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: All's Well That Ends Well, Act 1, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on force and heaven

Ay, Much is the force of heaven-bred poesy.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on heaven

in

Unhand me, gentlemen, By heaven, I'll make a ghost of him that lets me.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 4.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on heaven

in

O heaven! were man But constant, he were perfect.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Two Gentlemen of Verona

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on happiness, heaven, necessity, reason, and virtue

All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. Teach thy necessity to reason thus; There is no virtue like necessity.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard II, Act i, scene 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on deed, fear, force, god, heart, heaven, judaism, justice, mercy, power, prayer, quality, salvation, and seasons

The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath: it is twice bless'd; It blesseth him that gives and him that takes: 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above the sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the heart of kings, It is an attribute to God himself, And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice. Therefore Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That in the course of justice none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy, And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Merchant of Venice, Act iv. Sc. 1,

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on angels, bankers, gold, harmony, heaven, immortality, music, soul, and stillness

How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank! Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears; soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica: look, how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold; There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins. Such harmony is in immortal souls; But whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Merchant of Venice, Act 5, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on beginning, food, fortune, good, heaven, laughter, nobility, time, and world

JAQUES: A fool, a fool! I met a fool i' the forest, A motley fool; a miserable world! As I do live by food, I met a fool Who laid him down and bask'd him in the sun, And rail'd on Lady Fortune in good terms, In good set terms and yet a motley fool. 'Good morrow, fool,' quoth I. 'No, sir,' quoth he, 'Call me not fool till heaven hath sent me fortune:' And then he drew a dial from his poke, And, looking on it with lack-lustre eye, Says very wisely, 'It is ten o'clock: Thus we may see,' quoth he, 'how the world wags: 'Tis but an hour ago since it was nine, And after one hour more 'twill be eleven; And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe, And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot; And thereby hangs a tale.' When I did hear The motley fool thus moral on the time, My lungs began to crow like chanticleer, That fools should be so deep-contemplative, And I did laugh sans intermission An hour by his dial. O noble fool! A worthy fool! Motley's the only wear.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 2, scene 7.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on beauty, devil, earth, fear, heaven, hell, imagination, joy, and poets

The lunatic, the lover and the poet Are of imagination all compact: One sees more devils than vast hell can hold, That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt: The poet's eye, in fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name. Such tricks hath strong imagination, That if it would but apprehend some joy, It comprehends some bringer of that joy; Or in the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a bush supposed a bear!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act 5, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on earth, heaven, love, and needs

CLEOPATRA: If it be love indeed, tell me how much. ANTONY: There's beggary in the love that can be reckoned. CLEOPATRA: I'll set a bourne how far to be belov'd. ANTONY: Then must thou needs find out new heaven, new earth.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Antony and Cleopatra, Act 1, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

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