habits

A Quote by Epictetus on anger, evil, habits, and present

Whenever you are angry, be assured that it is not only a Present evil, but that you have increased a habit.

Epictetus (c. 50 - 120)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward O. Sisson on beginning, body, certainty, contentment, education, facts, familiarity, habits, happiness, health, influence, life, mind, pleasure, principles, reason, soul, usefulness, and value

Our likes and dislikes exert a fateful influence upon both our own happiness and our value to others. The ancients recognized this fully, but modern education has long neglected it and is now slowly beginning to rub its eyes and awake to the significance of training the tastes. To like the wrong things may mean the ruin of body and soul, a worthless and wretched life, and all that we may well pray to be delivered from. To like the right things is an indispensable condition to health of body and mind, to contentment and happiness, and to usefulness. Likes and dislikes run powerfully into habits and even affect principles: for when we are fond of a certain pleasure it is hard for us to condemn it, even though our reason bids us do so. It is a too familiar fact that some of the most deadly foes of physical health and vigor are certain tastes, either pathological, like that for intoxicants and narcotics, or excessive, as those of the Giordano or sensualist.

Edward O. Sisson

Source: The Essentials of CharacterDeveloping tastes, The Macmillan Company, 1915

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward O. Sisson on absence, certainty, fatherhood, habits, indolence, schools, and secrets

The secret of the whole matter is that a habit is not the mere tendency to repeat a certain act, nor is it established by the mere repetition of the act. Habit is a fixed tendency to react or respond in a certain way to a given stimulus; and the formation of habit always involves the two elements, the stimulus and the response or reaction. The indolent lad goes to school not in response to any stimulus in the school itself, but to the pressure of his father's will; when that stimulus is absent, the reaction as a matter of course does not occur.

Edward O. Sisson

Source: The Essentials of Character, The Macmillan Company, 1915

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward O. Sisson on character, education, habits, kindness, knowledge, laws, thought, and words

In one sense the whole process of development consists of the formation of habits; for knowledge itself, and the powers of thought, as well as the higher elements in the will, all depend upon the establishment of fixed ways of reacting to given stimuli. Consequently, the general laws of habituation underlie the whole of education. But the term habit is more commonly restricted to those established reactions that act with little or no participation of consciousness, or, in other words, mechanically or automatically. Such habits as these begin to form very early, and constitute a kind of supporting framework for the higher elements of character.

Edward O. Sisson

Source: The Essentials of Character, The Macmillan Company, 1915

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward O. Sisson on children, clarity, confusion, desires, enemies, facts, generations, good, habits, hatred, ignorance, instinct, knowledge, learning, life, love, men, men and women, needs, perception, philosophy, problems, reading, remedies,

Abraham Lincoln tells somewhere that as a boy when he met an obscure or ambiguous sentence in his reading it threw him into a sort of rage. The fact is that this was simply a form of instinct for clear thinking which is found in every child and manifests itself abundantly to the perception of the good teacher. Far more important than any particular piece of knowledge, than geography or arithmetic or spelling, is this love of clearness in our mental life and instinctive hatred of confusion and obscurity. Let us learn to know what we know clearly and definitely, and also how we know it. The great intellectual need of men and women in the outer world is not so much more knowledge as it is better knowledge and better thinking. There is much philosophy in the humorist's remark, "It was never my ignorance that done me up, but the things I know'd that wasn't so." The great enemies of intellectual life are superstition, gullibility, and fallacious reasoning. A mere knowledge of facts, important as that is, is no safeguard against these. A conscious desire and resolve to think clearly is the true remedy. Our national success will depend largely upon the development of a generation of men and women who have formed a love and habit of clear thinking and who can do their part in solving the problems that confront civilized man today.

Edward O. Sisson

Source: The Essentials of Character, The Macmillan Company, 1915

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward Gibbon on books, habits, learning, originality, and thinking

Unprovided with original learning, unformed in the habits of thinking, unskilled in the arts of composition, I resolved to write a book.

Edward Gibbon (1737 - 1794)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edouard Fournier on chance, habits, jokes, and speech

When Harel wished to put a joke or witticism into circulation, he was in the habit of connecting it with some celebrated name, on the chance of reclaiming it if it took. Thus he assigned to Talleyrand, in the "Nain Jaune," the phrase, "Speech was given to man to disguise his thoughts."

Edouard Fournier (1819 - 1880)

Source: L'Esprit dans l'Histoire. 1857

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edgar Albert Guest on day, friendship, gloom, grief, habits, health, laughter, learning, life, men, sharing, tenderness, and work

Be grateful for the kindly friends that walk along your way; Be grateful for the skies of blue that smile from day to day; Be grateful for the health you own, the work you find to do, For round about you there are men less fortunate than you. Be grateful for the growing trees, the roses soon to bloom, The tenderness of kindly hearts that shared your days of gloom; Be grateful for the morning dew, the grass beneath your feet, The soft caresses of your babes and all their laughter sweet. Acquire the grateful habit, learn to see how blest you are, How much there is to gladden life, how little life to mar! And what if rain shall fall today and you with grief are sad; Be grateful that you can recall the joys that you have had.

Edgar Albert Guest (1881 - 1959)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Alexis Carrel on action, beginning, fear, grace, habits, humility, journeys, life, obligation, observation, prayer, pride, selfishness, sincerity, and soul

If you make a habit of sincere prayer, your life will be very noticeably and profoundly altered. Prayer stamps with its indelible mark our actions and demeanor. A tranquillity of bearing, a facial and bodily repose, are observed in those whose inner lives are thus enriched. Within the depths of consciousness a flame kindles. And man sees himself. He discovers his selfishness, his silly pride, his fears, his greeds, his blunders. He develops a sense of moral obligation, intellectual humility. Thus begins a journey of the soul toward the realm of grace. . . . [Continued]

Dr. Alexis Carrel (1873 - 1944)

Source: Tocqueville in Democracy in America, 1835

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Donald M. Nelson on acceptance, assumptions, beginning, change, habits, ideas, and past

We must drop the idea that change comes slowly. It does ordinarily - in part because we think it does. Today changes must come fast; and we must adjust our mental habits, so that we can accept comfortably the idea of stopping one thing and beginning another overnight. We must discard the idea that past routine, past ways of doing things, are probably the best ways. On the contrary, we must assume that there is probably a better way to do almost everything. We must stop assuming that a thing which has never been done before probably cannot be done at all.

Donald M. Nelson

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content