good

A Quote by Aeschylus on fortune, god, good, and men

Good fortune is a god among men, and more than a god.

Aeschylus (525 - 456 BC)

Source: The Libation Bearers, 59

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on church, good, and people

The bells they sound on Bredon, And still the steeples hum. "Come all to church, good people"- Oh, noisy bells, be dumb; I hear you, I will come.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 21, st. 7

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on anguish, danger, death, good, guilt, love, shame, sharing, and soul

But if you ever come to a road where danger; Or guilt or anguish or shame's to share. Be good to the lad who loves you true, And the soul that was born to die for you; And whistle and I'll be there.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on discrimination, good, hope, literature, perception, and pleasure

Good literature continually read for pleasure must, let us hope, do some good to the reader: must quicken his perception though dull, and sharpen his discrimination though blunt, and mellow the rawness of his personal opinions.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: The Name and Nature of Poetry

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on church, earth, endurance, good, heaven, and peace

Good night; ensured release, Imperishable peace, Have these for yours. * While sky and sea and land And earth's foundations stand And heaven endures. *These three lines are on the tablet over Housman's grave in the parish church at Ludlow, Shropshire, England

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: More Poems, 1936, 48 (Alta Quies), st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on good, justice, labor, liberty, men, names, people, tyranny, and world

The world has never had a good definition of the word liberty, and the American people, just now, are much in want of one. We all declare for liberty; but in using the same word we do not all mean the same thing. With some the word liberty may mean for each man to do as he pleases with himself, and the product of his labor; while with others the same word may mean for some men to do as they please with other men, and the product of other men's labor. Here are two, not only different, but incompatible things, called by the same name - liberty. And it follows that each of the things is, by the respective parties, called by two different and incompatible names - liberty and tyranny.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address at sanitary fair, Baltimore, Maryland, April 18, 1864

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on good

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I am for those means which will give the greatest good to the greatest number.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on chance and good

If we do not make common cause to save the good ship of the Union on this voyage, nobody will have a chance to pilot her on another voyage.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on encouragement, good, justice, labor, violence, and world

Property is the fruit of labor . . . property is desirable . . . is a positive good in the world. That some should be rich shows that others may become rich, and hence is just encouragement to industry and enterprise. Let not him who is houseless pull down the house of another; but let him labor diligently and build one for himself, thus by example assuring that his own shall be safe from violence when built.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Reply to New York Workingmen's Democratic Republican Association, March 21, 1864

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on encouragement, good, justice, labor, violence, war, and world

Nor should this lead us to a war upon property, or the owners of property. Property is the fruit of labor; property is desirable; is a positive good in the world. That some should be rich shows that others may become rich and, hence, is just encouragement to industry and enterprise. Let not him who is houseless pull down the house of another, but let him labor diligently and build one for himself, thus, by example, assuring that his own shall be safe from violence when built.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

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