gold

A Quote by Traditional on birds, christmas, dance, day, gold, and love

The Twelve Days of Christmas The first day of Christmas My true love sent to me A partridge in a pear-tree. The second day of Christmas My true love sent to me Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The third day of Christmas My true love sent to me Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The fourth day of Christmas My true love sent to me Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The fifth day of Christmas My true love sent to me Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The sixth day of Christmas My true love sent to me Six geese a-laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The seventh day of Christmas My true love sent to me Seven swans a-swlmmmg, Six geese a-laying? Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The eighth day of Christmas My true love sent to me Eight maids a-milking, Seven swans a-swimming, Six geese a-laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The ninth day of Christmas My true love sent to me Nine drummers drumming, Eight maids a-milking, Seven swans a-swimming, Six geese a-laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The tenth day of Christmas My true love sent to me Ten pipers piping, Nine drummers drumming, Eight maids a-milking, Seven swans a-swimming, Six geese a-laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The eleventh day of Christmas My true love sent to me Eleven ladies dancing, Ten pipers piping, Nine drummers drumming, Eight maids a-milking, Seven swans a-swimming, Six geese a-laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree. The twelfth day of Christmas My true love sent to me Twelve lords a-leaping, Eleven ladies dancing, Ten pipers piping, Nine drummers drumming, Eight maids a-milking, Seven swans a-swimming, Six geese a-laying, Five gold rings, Four colly birds, Three French hens, Two turtle-doves And a partridge in a pear-tree.

Traditional

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Traditional on angels, children, christ, christianity, fear, gold, good, lies, rest, salvation, silence, sleep, and sons

What Child Is This? What Child is this, who, laid to rest On Mary's lap, is sleeping? Whom angels greet with anthems sweet, While shepherds watch are keeping? Refrain: This, this is Christ the King, Whom shepherds guard and angels sing; Haste, haste to bring Him laud, The Babe, the Son of Mary. Why lies He in such mean estate, Where ox and ass are feeding? Good Christians fear: for sinners here The silent Word is pleading. Refrain So bring Him incense, gold, and myrrh, Come peasant, King to own Him; The King of Kings salvation brings; Let loving hearts enthrone Him! Refrain

Traditional

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tony Mitton on cats and gold

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Drenching the pavement, warming the wall, bathing the cat in a slumbering sprawl . . . Waking the buds that break from the tree. Shaking out gold, and all for free.

Tony Mitton

Source: Spring Sunshine

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas J. Watson on america, death, discovery, future, generations, gold, greatness, happiness, humanity, inventions, investment, life, simplicity, time, value, and world

A tribute, published October 22, 1931, to Thomas Alva Edison upon his death: More than any other man, Mr. Edison lifted us out of the material surroundings of the Middle Ages. For most part, his inventions were spectacular in that they served to effect the emancipation of humanity and at the same time made possible mass production, greater factories, new and faster transportation methods, speedier distribution of commodities and a general increase in the happiness and higher standards of living for the peoples of the world. His inventions have provided employment directly for more than a million persons and many millions are employed because of their indirect benefits. It has been recorded that the investment value of all the undertakings rooted in his inventions equals the value of all the gold mined in the world since Columbus discovered America. Thomas A. Edison, whom we revered for his simplicity and his greatness, has passed on, but his name and his achievements remain to be magnified in the light of their untold benefits to future generations.

Thomas Watson (1874 - 1956)

Source: Thomas J. Watson in Men–Minutes–Money, a Collection of Excerpts from Talks . . .

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hood on gold

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Gold! Gold! Gold! Gold! Bright and yellow, hard and cold.

Thomas Hood (1798 - 1845)

Source: Her Moral.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on cats, gold, and heart

What female heart can gold despise? What cat 's averse to fish?

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: On the death of a Favourite Cat.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Strickland Gillian on gold, motherhood, and wealth

You may have tangible wealth untold; Caskets of jewels and coffers of gold. Richer than I you can never be - I had a mother who read to me.

Strickland Gillian

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sophocles on death, gold, grief, sorrow, and tears

If it were possible to heal sorrow by weeping and to raise the dead with tears, gold were less prized than grief.

Sophocles (496 - 406 BC)

Source: Fragment. 510.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on agreement, fate, gold, love, and wishes

'T is an old tale and often told; But did my fate and wish agree, Ne'er had been read, in story old, Of maiden true betray'd for gold, That loved, or was avenged, like me.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More on gold, men, thought, and value

They wander much to hear that gold, which in itself is so useless a thing, should be everywhere so much esteemed, that even men for whom it was made, and by whom it has its value, should yet be thought of less value than it is.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Utopia, 1516, Of Jewels and Wealth

Contributed by: Zaady

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