gold

A Quote by Alexander Pope on age, books, children, emptiness, gold, laws, life, nature, play, prayer, and youth

Behold the child, by Nature's kindly law, Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw; Some livelier plaything gives his youth delight, A little louder, but as empty quite; Scarfs, garters, gold, amuse his riper stage, And beads and prayer-books are the toys of age. Pleased with this bauble still, as that before, Till tired he sleeps, and life's poor play is o'er.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 274.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alan Greenspan on economics, freedom, and gold

An almost hysterical antagonism toward the gold standard is one issue which unites statists of all persuasions. They seem to sense . . . that gold and economic freedom are inseparable.

Alan Greenspan (1926 -)

Source: 1966

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aesop on gold and thinking

Thinking to get at once all the gold the goose could give, he killed it and opened it only to find-nothing.

Aesop (620 - 560 BC)

Source: The Goose with the Golden Eggs

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on gold

in

Oh tarnish late on Wenlock Edge, Gold that I never see.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 39, st. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adam Smith on america, beginning, conquest, discovery, economics, gold, injustice, prophets, and thought

Modern critics of the Conquest have an unlikely ally in the eighteenth-century prophet of laissez-faire economics: "It is not by the importation of gold and silver, that the discovery of America has enriched Europe. ...The commodities of Europe were almost all new to America, and many of those of America were new to Europe. A new set of exchanges, therefore, began t o take place which had never been thought of before, and which should naturally have proved as advantageous to the new, as it certainly did to the old continent. The savage injustice of the Europeans rendered an event, which ought to have been beneficial to all, ruinous and destructive to several of those unfortunate countries."

Adam Smith

Source: The Wealth of Nations, 1776

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on anecdotes, art, beginning, character, communication, freedom, gold, government, life, people, presidency, privacy, silence, and worth

Gentlemen, suppose all the property you were worth was in gold, and you had put it in the hands of Blondin to carry across the Niagara River on a rope, would you shake the cable, or keep shouting out to him - "Blondin, stand up a little straighter - Blondin, stoop a little more - go a little faster - lean a little more to the north - lean a little more to the south?" No, you would hold your breath as well as your tongue, and keep your hands off until he was safe over. The Government are carrying an immense weight. Untold treasures are in their hands. They are doing the very best they can. Don't badger them. Keep silence, and we'll get you safe across. -Francis B. Carpenter, "Anecdotes and Reminiscences of President Lincoln" in Henry Jarvis Raymond, The Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln..., p. 752 (1865). Carpenter, a portrait artist, lived in the White House for six months beginning February 1864, to paint the president and the entire Cabinet. His relations with the president became of an "intimate character," and he was permitted "the freedom of his private office at almost all hours,...privileged to see and know more of his daily life" than most people. He states that he "endeavored to embrace only those [anecdotes] which bear the marks of authenticity. Many....I myself heard the President relate; others were communicated to me by persons who either heard or took part in them" (p. 725). Blondin (real name Jean Francois Gravelet) was a French tightrope walker who crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope in 1855, 1859, and 1860.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: reply to critics 1864, Francis B. Carpenter, in H J Raymond, Life & Public Service of A. Lincoln

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on ability, belief, citizenship, country, departure, gold, ideas, interest, life, mountains, nations, prosperity, war, wealth, and world

I have very large ideas of the mineral wealth of our Nation. I believe it practically inexhaustible. It abounds all over the western country, from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific, and its development has scarcely commenced. . . . Immigration, which even the war has not stopped, will land upon our shores hundred of thousands more per year from overcrowded Europe. I intend to point them to the gold and silver that waits for them in the West. Toll the miners from me, that I shall promote their interests to the utmost of my ability; because their prosperity is the prosperity of the Nation, and we shall prove in a very few years that we are indeed the treasury of the world. Message for the miners of the West, delivered verbally to Speaker of the House Schuyler Colfax, who was about to depart on a trip to the West, in the afternoon of April 14, 1865, before Lincoln left for Ford's Theatre. Colfax delivered the message to a large crowd of citizens in Denver, Colorado, May 27, 1865. -Edward Winslow Martin, The Life and Public Services of Schuyler Colfax, pp. 187-88 (1868).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: message for the miners of the West (SEE BELOW)

Contributed by: Zaady

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