giving

A Quote by Ayn Rand on achievement, assumptions, charity, fighting, giving, ideas, legends, life, luxury, meaning, mediocrity, needs, pity, power, virtue, and wealth

It is said that [Robin Hood] fought against the looting rulers and returned the loot to those who had been robbed, but that is not the meaning of the legend which has survived. He is remembered, not as a champion of property, but as a champion of need, not as a defender of the robbed, but as a provider of the poor. He is held to be the first man who assumed a halo of virtue by practicing charity with wealth which he did not own, by giving away goods which he had not produced, by making others pay for the luxury of his pity. He is the man who became the symbol of the idea that need, not achievement, is the source of rights, that we don't have to produce, only to want, that the earned does not belong to us, but the unearned does. He became a justification for every mediocrity who, unable to make his own living, had demanded the power to dispose of the property of his betters, by proclaiming his willingness to devote his life to his inferiors at the price of robbing his superiors.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 534)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Artur Rodzinski on dedication, giving, harmony, individuality, learning, life, love, mankind, music, nations, neighbors, problems, secrets, service, temperament, wonder, and world

In or orchestra we have many nationalities, types, and temperaments. We have learned to forget individual likes, dislikes, and differences of temperament for the sake of music to which we have dedicated our lives. I often wonder if we could not solve the world's problems on a similar basis of harmony. Think what a single individual in a symphony orchestra can accomplish by giving up his individual traits and ambitions in the service of music. . . . Suppose that in life you had the same all-embracing love for the whole of mankind and for your neighbor in particular. Only when every one of us and every nation learns the secret of love for all mankind will the world become a great orchestra, following the beat of the Greatest Conductor of all.

Artur Rodzinski (1892 - 1958)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arnold H. Glasow on facts, giving, life, and teenage

Telling a teen-ager the facts of life is like giving a fish a bath.

Arnold H. Glasow

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on birth, certainty, children, fatherhood, giving, motherhood, reason, and suffering

This is the reason why mothers are more devoted to their children than fathers: it is that they suffer more in giving them birth and are more certain that they are their own.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupery on generosity, sharing, charity, and giving

When you give yourself, you receive more than you give.

Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1900 - 1944)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins on giving and people

He is very fond of making things which he does not want, and then giving them to people who have no use for them.

Anthony Hope (1863 - 1933)

Source: The Dolly Dialogues

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Madame Anne Sophie Swetchine on charity and giving

He who has never denied himself for the sake of giving has but glanced at the joys of charity.

Anne Sophie Swetchine (1782 - 1857)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by André Gide on giving and possessions

Complete possession is proved only by giving. All you are unable to give possesses you.

Andre Gide (1869 - 1951)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on facts, familiarity, giving, god, immortality, and sacred

SCARABAEUS, n. The sacred beetle of the ancient Egyptians, allied to our familiar "tumble-bug." It was supposed to symbolize immortality, the fact that God knew why giving it its peculiar sanctity.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on giving, love, lovers, men, stability, and wives

LEAD, n. A heavy blue-gray metal much used in giving stability to light lovers - particularly to those who love not wisely but other men's wives.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content