gifts

A Quote by Phyllis McGinley on children, compliments, gifts, life, and praise

Praise is warming and desirable . . . what the human race lives on like bread. But praise is an earned thing. It has to be deserved like an honorary degree or a hug from a child. A compliment is manna, a free gift.

Phyllis McGinley (1905 - 1978)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Phillips Brooks on angels, birth, blessings, christ, darkness, earth, fear, gifts, god, hope, lies, love, men, peace, silence, sleep, soul, and world

O little town of Bethlehem, How still we see thee lie; Above thy deep and dreamless sleep The silent stars go by; Yet in thy dark streets shineth The everlasting Light. The hopes and fears of all the years Are met in thee tonight. For Christ is born of Mary, And, gathered all above While mortals sleep,the angels keep Their watch of wond'ring love. O morning stars, together Proclaim the holy birth, And praises sing to God the King, And peace to men on earth. How silently, how silently The wondrous gift is giv'n! So God imparts to human hearts The blessings of his heav'n. No ear may hear his coming; But in this world of sin, Where meek souls will receive him, still The dear Christ enters in.

Phillips Brooks (1835 - 1893)

Source: O little town of Bethlehem, 1867

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Oliver Wendell Holmes on gifts and mistakes

Nothing is so frequent as to mistake an ordinary human gift for a special and extraordinary endowment.

Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nicholas Grimald on friendship, gifts, men, mortality, and world

Of all the heavenly gifts that mortal men commend, What trusty treasure in the world can counterfail a friend?

Nicholas Grimald (1519 - 1562)

Source: Of Friendship

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on gifts, judgment, men, and reality

Men in general judge more from appearances than from reality. All men have eyes, but few have the gift of penetration.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on children, commitment, disappointment, divinity, failure, faith, fatherhood, gifts, god, ingratitude, justice, learning, life, love, men, mercy, perspective, power, reflection, and temptation

Yet, seeing this ingratitude of those who are without perspective should not cause us to make reflexive rejoinders to unbelievers. Rather, we, for our part, ought to contemplate how truly deep God's commitment to free agency must be, how truly deep (and unpossessive) his love for his children must be to allow us to err, to fail, to learn, and to grow. And how wonderful is his refusal to impose, by his power, a faith that otherwise seems to come so slowly and to so few when men are left free. Sensing, even on such a small scale, these divine commitments ought to help us to reflect them in our lives. If we are tempted to unwise responses because of our small-scale frustrations with those who are ungrateful, with those who misuse their gifts, lo, how much greater the sense of disappointment at the divine level is. And yet his commitment to free agency remains intact, and his love, justice, and mercy continue even for those who defy their Father.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: For The Power Is In Them, pg. 28-29, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on debt, eternity, faith, gifts, immortality, life, and mortality

Comparatively, we are so much quicker to return favors and to pay our debts to mortals - and we should be responsive and grateful. But what of Him who gave us mortal life itself, who will ere long give us all immortality, and who proffers to the faithful the greatest gift of all, eternal life? We are poor bookkeepers, indeed!

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Ensign, Nov. 1988, p. 31, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on awareness, blessings, existence, gifts, god, grace, journeys, laws, life, men, order, perspective, problems, sensuality, speech, spirituality, and vision

We are all aware of man's poor peripheral vision in that his views are often narrow and heedless of what is going on on each side of him. Man's problem is often one of length of view, too. This poorness of perspective often produces wonderful and pathetic paradoxes: men who have been given the blessings of life by the grace of God, cry that life is senseless; men who have been given breath and voice by God, use the powers of speech to deny God's existence; men who have been given the capacity to feel, exult so much in this gift that sensual things sublimate spiritual things; and some men who see our reaching out to distant places in our solar system conclude that this special planet is a random, unplanned mutant and refuse to connect the order of physical laws (that makes such journeys into space possible) with an Orderer.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: For The Power Is In Them, pg. 28-29, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on gifts, purpose, spirituality, talent, time, and work

Meanwhile, spiritual submissiveness brings about the wiser use of our time, talents, and gifts as compared with our laboring diligently but conditionally to establish our own righteousness instead of the Lord's (D&C 1:16). After all, Lucifer was willing to work very hard, but conditionally in his own way and for his own purposes. (Moses 4;1).

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Not My Will, But Thine, pg. 94, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on accidents, automobiles, consequences, defense, driving, fatherhood, gifts, god, mercy, mortality, pain, parenthood, principles, sons, suffering, teenage, and time

Some mistakenly misread the mercy and graciousness of God. For instance, some partial believers are always scolding God, or disregarding Him, because of the observable and lamentable consequences of our misuse of God's gift to us of moral agency. It is as if a teenage son, given his first car, promptly had an accident with resulting pain, suffering, and expense, and the errant son then railed at his father for permitting the suffering resulting from the son's misuse of the gift of the automobile. Granted, in defense of the analogy, mortal parents ought not to give youngsters automobiles too soon, and then only when they have provided wise counsel, driver training, and so on. But there still comes a time when, if they are ever to drive alone, trained teenagers must be left alone at the wheel. The principle is the same with us in the second estate.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Sermons Not Spoken, p.20-21, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

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