genius

A Quote by Walter Russell on mystic, genius, cosmic, consciousness, mind, god, bible, center, omniscience, inspiration, knowledge, cosmoc, illumination, jesus, light, spirit, mankind, goal, journey, and man

Beyond the genius is the mystic.
The mystic is one who has attained cosmic consciousness by a complete severance of the seats of consciousness and sensation. He is then almost totally unaware of his body and is totally aware of the Light of God centering him. Omniscience comes to him in that timeless blinding flash of light which is characteristic of a complete severance. This experience was described in the illumination of St. Paul. Every timeless flash of intense inspiration which comes to any man is a partial illumination, for inspiration is the manner in which new knowledge comes to man from the cosmos.
Of all mystics, Jesus was the outstanding example of all time. He was the only One in all history to have known complete cosmic-conscious unity with God.
The Bible refers to cosmic-conscious experience as “the illumination” or “being in the Light” or “in the Spirit.”
In all history less than forty cases of partial cosmic consciousness are known, and probably not more that three of these anywhere nearly approached the complete state of illumination experienced by the Nazarene.
Cosmic Consciousness is the ultimate goal of all mankind. All will know it before the long journey of man is finished, but there are many in this new age just dawning who are ready for it in part, if not fully.
Many desire it fully, but it is best that it come bit by bit for the complete severance is very dangerous. The ecstasy of this supreme experience is so great that one does not wish to come back. The power of severance of soul from body is within easy accomplishment, but to step back into the body is very difficult.

Walter Russell

Source: The Secret of Light

Contributed by: esaruoho

A Quote by Sol Luckman on genius, perversity, decadence, suburb, new age, polarity, satire, parody, comedy, spoof, humor, and luke soloman

It didn’t take a genius to figure out I’d come to Perver City. Technically a suburb of New Age City, Perver City is where all the people who can’t make it in New Age City wind up.

Sol Luckman

Source: Beginner's Luke: Book I of the Beginner's Luke Series, Pages: 34

Contributed by: Leigh

A Quote by Orson Welles on genius and inspiration

"The word genius was whispered into my ear, the first thing I ever heard, while I was still mewling in my crib. So it never occurred to me that I wasn't until middle age."

Orson Welles (1915 - 1985)

Contributed by: esaruoho

A Quote by Wayne Dyer on shakespeare, picasso, galileo, spirit, genius, greatness, and energy

The unseen energy that was once in Shakespeare or Picasso or Galileo or any human form, is also available to all of us. That is because the spirit energy does not die, it simply changes form.

Wayne Dyer

Contributed by: lyonesseofgod

A Quote by Daniel Pinchbeck on art, techne, technique, technology, process, martin heidegger, arts saving power, technological enframing, deeper collective vision, world as art, sri nisargadatta maharaj, terrence mckenna, gadgetry, shift in perspective,

“(Martin) Heidegger notes that the origin of the word “technology” comes from the Greek word techne, and this word was applied not only to technology, but to art, and artistic technique as well.  'Once there was a time when the bringing-forth of the true into the beautiful was also called techne.'  He found this to be a numinous correspondence, and considered that, in art, the 'saving power' capable of confronting the abyss of the technological enframing might be found.

If art contains a saving power, it is not in the atomized artworks produced by individual subjects, but in a deeper collective vision that sees the world as a work of art, one that is already, as (Sri) Nisargadatta (Maharaj) and (Terrence) McKenna suggest, perfect in its 'satisfying all-at-onceness'.'  Instead of envisioning an ultimately boring 'technological singularity,' we might be better served by considering an evolution of technique, of skillful means, aimed at this world, as it is now.  Technology might find its proper place in our lives if we experienced such a shift in perspective–in a society oriented around technique, we might find that we desired far less gadgetry.  We might start to prefer slowness to speed, subtlety and complexity to products aimed at standardized mind.  Rather than projecting the spiritual quest and the search for the good life onto futuristic A.I.s,  we could actually take the time to fulfill those goals, here and now, in the present company of our friends and lovers.

Part of the problem seems embedded in the basic concept of a concrescence or singularity, which compacts our possibilities rather than expands them.  The notion of a technological singularity reflects our culture's obsessive rationality, reducing qualitative aspects of being to quantifiable factors, and imposing abstract systems over complex variables.  Instead of a technological singularity, we might reorient our thinking toward a more desirable multiplicity of technique.  Technique is erotic in essence; it is what Glenn Gould or Thelonious Monk expresses through the piano–the interplay between learned skill and quantum improvisation that is the stuff of genius.  Technique embraces the now-ness of our living world; technology throws us into endless insatiation.”

Daniel Pinchbeck

Source: 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl, Pages: 106-107

Contributed by: Darshan

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on genius and patience

Genius is nothing but a greater aptitude for patience.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on psychologist, poet, inspiration, genius, esperience, phenomena, objective, and observation

Of course, a psychologist would find it more direct to study the inspired poet. He would make concrete studies of inspiration in individual geniuses. But for all that, would he experience the phenomena of inspiration? His human documentation gathered from inspired poets could hardly be related, except from the exterior, in an ideal of objective observations. Comparison of inspired poets would soon make us lose sight of inspiration.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 6..7

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Dan Simmons on express, thought, genius, civilization, cosmos, word, idea, and human

Gass once wrote: "Language serves not only to express thought but to make possible thoughts which could not exist without it." Here is the essence of mankind's creative genius: not the edifices of civilization nor the bang-flash weapons which can end it, but the words which fertilize new concepts like spermatozoa attacking an ovum. It might be argued that the Siamese twin infants of word/idea are the only contribution the human species can, will, or should make to the raveling cosmos.

Dan Simmons

Source: Hyperion, Pages: 191

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on genius

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Towering genius disdains a beaten path . . . It scorns to tread in the footsteps of any predecessor, however illustrious. It thirsts for distinction.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Lyceum Address

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by William Blake on william blake, talent, and genius

  The eagle never lost so much time as when he submitted to learn of the crow.

William Blake (1757 - 1827)

Contributed by: Rich

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