fortune

A Quote by Denis Waitley on fame, fortune, integrity, and life

A life lived with integrity -- even if it lacks the trappings of fame and fortune is a shinning star in whose light others may follow in the years to come.

Denis Waitley

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Zimmermann on fortune

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Many have been ruined by their fortune, and many have escaped ruin by the want of fortune. To obtain it the great have become little, and the little great.

Zimmermann

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Tyler Page on adoption, america, belief, constitution, country, democracy, duty, enemies, equality, fortune, freedom, government, humanity, justice, laws, life, love, nations, people, principles, respect, sacrifice, and support

The American's Creed adopted by the House of Representatives, April 3, 1918 I believe in the United States of America as a government of the people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers are derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a republic, a sovereign Nation of many sovereign States; a perfect Union one and inseparable; established upon those principles of freedom; equality, justice and humanity for which American patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it is my duty to my country to love it, to support its Constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend if against all enemies.

William Tyler Page (1868 - 1942)

Source: The American's Creed was a result of a nationwide contest for writing a National Creed

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Makepeace Thackeray on ambition, difficulty, fortune, greatness, heart, and losing

To endure is greater than to dare; to tire out hostile fortune; to be daunted by no difficulty;to keep heart when all have lost it; to go through intrigue spotless;to forego even ambition when the end is gained - who can say this is not greatness?

William Thackeray (1811 - 1863)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, belief, country, death, fortune, friendship, honor, joy, judgment, life, love, lovers, men, patience, respect, rudeness, senses, silence, slavery, tears, and wisdom

BRUTUS: Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear: believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: - Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, conscience, country, cowardice, death, delay, dreams, fortune, heart, laws, life, love, merit, mind, mortality, patience, questions, resolution, respect, sleep, suffering, thought, time, trouble, and wishes

To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and, by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die: to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause. There's the respect That makes calamity of so long life; For who would bear the whips an scorns of time, The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of dispriz'd love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have, Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience doth make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pitch and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action. Soft you now! The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons Be all my sins remember'd.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 3, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on fortune and speech

Mend your speech a little, lest it may mar your fortune.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on fortune and pride

My pride fell with my fortunes.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act I, sc. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on fortune, life, and men

There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune; Omitted, all the voyage of their life Is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat, And we must take the current when it serves, Or lose our ventures.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Caesar, Act iv, Sc. 3,

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on beginning, food, fortune, good, heaven, laughter, nobility, time, and world

JAQUES: A fool, a fool! I met a fool i' the forest, A motley fool; a miserable world! As I do live by food, I met a fool Who laid him down and bask'd him in the sun, And rail'd on Lady Fortune in good terms, In good set terms and yet a motley fool. 'Good morrow, fool,' quoth I. 'No, sir,' quoth he, 'Call me not fool till heaven hath sent me fortune:' And then he drew a dial from his poke, And, looking on it with lack-lustre eye, Says very wisely, 'It is ten o'clock: Thus we may see,' quoth he, 'how the world wags: 'Tis but an hour ago since it was nine, And after one hour more 'twill be eleven; And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe, And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot; And thereby hangs a tale.' When I did hear The motley fool thus moral on the time, My lungs began to crow like chanticleer, That fools should be so deep-contemplative, And I did laugh sans intermission An hour by his dial. O noble fool! A worthy fool! Motley's the only wear.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 2, scene 7.

Contributed by: Zaady

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