fighting

A Quote by Albert Einstein on atoms, belief, books, civilization, earth, fighting, men, people, thinking, and war

. . . I do not believe that civilization will be wiped out in a war fought with the atomic bomb. Perhaps two thirds of the people of the earth might be killed, but enough men capable of thinking and enough books, would be left to start again, and civilization could be restored.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Source: the Atlantic Monthly, Nov. 1945

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on fighting

When I hear a man preach, I like to see him act as if he were fighting bees.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on bravery, circumstances, danger, delay, discipline, enemies, failure, fighting, friendship, impulses, mistakes, nations, victory, and work

Our cause, then, must be intrusted to, and conducted by, its own undoubted friends - those whose hands are free, whose hearts are in the work - who do care for the result. Two years ago the Republicans of the nation mustered over thirteen hundred thousand strong. We did this under the single impulse of resistance to a common danger, with every external circumstance against us. Of strange, discordant, and even, hostile elements, we gathered from the four winds, and formed and fought the battle through, under the constant hot fire of a disciplined, proud, and pampered enemy. Did we brave all then to falter now? - now when that same enemy is wavering, dissevered, and belligerent? The result is not doubtful. We shall not fail - if we stand firm, we shall not fail. Wise councils may accelerate or mistakes delay it, but, sooner or later, the victory is sure to come.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: speech at Republican state convention as US Senate candidate from IL, June 16, 1858

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on birth, bravery, death, dedication, earth, fatherhood, fighting, freedom, god, government, liberty, life, men, nations, people, power, struggle, testing, war, work, and world

Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate - we cannot consecrate - we cannot hallow - this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or to detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far nobly so advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Address at Gettysburg, November 19, 1863

Contributed by: Zaady

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