faults

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on faults and praise

To find out a girl's faults, praise her to her girlfriends.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on confession, errors, and faults

None but the well-bred man knows how to confess a fault, or acknowledge himself in an error.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: Poor Richard’s Almanac, 1738

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on authors, beginning, faults, and life

I should have no objection to go over the same life from its beginning to the end: requesting only the advantage authors have, of correcting in a second edition, the faults of the first.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: Autobiography, ch 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on absence, faults, and present

The absent are never without fault, nor the present without excuses.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Barbara Cartland on desires, faults, husbands, preparation, reason, wives, and women

A man will teach his wife what is needed to arouse his desires. And there is no reason for a woman to know any more than what her husband is prepared to teach her. If she gets married knowing far too much about what she wants and doesn't want then she will be ready to find fault with her husband.

Barbara Cartland (1901 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Barbara Cartland on faults, happiness, love, satisfaction, trying, wives, and women

A woman should say: "Have I made him happy? Is he satisfied? Does he love me more than he loved me before? Is he likely to go to bed with another woman?" If he does, then it's the wife's fault because she is not trying to make him happy.

Barbara Cartland (1901 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on acting, arrogance, character, courage, cruelty, discipline, driving, faults, independence, integrity, judgment, life, energy, men, mind, mistakes, power, pride, purpose, responsibility, selfishness, strength, vision, vulgarity, and

All your life, you have heard yourself denounced; not for your faults, but for your greatest virtues. You have been hated, not for your mistakes, but for your achievements. You have been scorned for all those qualities of character which are your highest pride. You have been called selfish for the courage of acting on your own judgment and bearing sole responsibility for your own life. You have been called arrogant for your independent mind. You have been called cruel for your unyielding integrity. You have been called anti-social for the vision that made you venture upon undiscovered roads. You have been called ruthless for the strength and self-discipline of your drive to your purpose. You have been called greedy for the magnificence of your power to create wealth. You, who've expended an inconceivable flow of energy, have been called a parasite. You, who've created abundance where there had been nothing but wastelands and helpless, starving men before you, have been called a robber. You, who've kept them all alive, have been called an exploiter. You, the purest and most moral man among them, have been sneered at as a 'vulgar materialist.' Have you stopped to ask them: by what right? - by what code? - by what standard?

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 422-3)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer on day, driving, emptiness, faults, force, good, manners, mercy, needs, pain, people, society, and time

On a cold winter's day, a group of porcupines huddled together to stay warm and keep from freezing. But soon they felt one another's quills and moved apart. When the need for warmth brought them closer together again, their quills again forced them apart. They were driven back and forth at the mercy of their discomforts until they found the distance from one another that provided both a maximum of warmth and a minimum of pain. In human beings, the emptiness and monotony of the isolated self produces a need for society. This brings people together, but their many offensive qualities and intolerable faults drive them apart again. The optimum distance that they finally find that permits them to coexist is embodied in politeness and good manners. Because of this distance between us, we can only partially satisfy our need for warmth, but at the same time, we are spared the stab of one another's quills.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anita Brookner on faults, good, and women

Good women always think it is their fault when someone else is being offensive. Bad women never take the blame for anything.

Anita Brookner (1938 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on confession, duty, faults, love, and truth

ACKNOWLEDGE, v.t. To confess. Acknowledgment of one another's faults is the highest duty imposed by our love of truth.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

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