fatherhood

A Quote by Roger Ward Babson on cities, country, fatherhood, motherhood, religion, and sons

I have not been able to find a single useful institution which has not been founded either by an intensely religious man or by the son of a praying father or a praying mother. I have made the statement before the chambers of commerce of all the largest cities of the country and have asked them to bring forward a case that is an exception to this rule. Thus far, I have not heard of a single one.

Roger Babson (1875 - 1967)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Southey on fatherhood and reason

"You are old, Father William," the young man cried, "The few locks which are left you are gray; You are hale, Father William, a hearty old man,- Now tell me the reason I pray."

Robert Southey (1774 - 1843)

Source: The Old Man's Comforts, and how he gained them.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Lynd on children, fatherhood, and happiness

Happy is the father whose child finds his attempts to amuse it amusing.

Robert Lynd (1879 - 1949)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on adversity, beginning, bitterness, charity, christmas, church, clarity, dance, darkness, day, fatherhood, garden, good, home, justice, kindness, life, motherhood, nature, pain, sons, soul, and understanding

Christmas at Sea The sheets were frozen hard, and they cut the naked hand; The decks were like a slide, where a seaman scarce could stand, The wind was a nor'-wester, blowing squally off the sea; And the cliffs and spouting breakers were the only thing a-lee. They heard the surf a-roaring before the break of day; But 'twas only with the peep of light we saw how ill we lay. We tumbled every hand on deck instanter, with a shout, And we gave her the maintops'l, and stood by to go about. All day we tack'd and tack'd between the South Head and the North; All day we haul'd the frozen sheets, and got no further forth; All day as cold as charity, in bitter pain and dread, For very life and nature we tack'd from head to head. We gave the South a wider berth, for there the tide-race roar'd; But every tack we made we brought the North Head close aboard; So's we saw the cliffs and houses, and the breakers running high, And the coastguard in his garden, with his glass against his eye. The frost was on the village roofs as white as ocean foam; The good red fires were burning bright in every 'longshore home; , The windows sparkled clear, and the chimneys volley'd out; And I vow we sniff'd the victuals as the vessel went about. The bells upon the church were rung with a right jovial cheer For it's just that I should tell you how (of all days in the year) This day of our adversity was blessed Christmas morn, And the house above the coastguard's was the house where I was born. O well I saw the pleasant room, the pleasant faces there, My mother's silver spectacles, my father's silver hair; And well I saw the firelight, like a flight of homely elves Go dancing round the china-plates that stand upon the shelves! And well I knew the talk they had, the talk that was of me, Of the shadow on the household and the son that went to sea; And O the wicked fool I seem'd, in every kind of way, To be here and hauling frozen ropes on blessed Christmas Day. They lit the high sea-light, and the dark began to fall. "All hands to loose topgallant sails." I heard the captain call. "By the Lord, she'll never stand it," our first mate Jackson cried. . . . "It's the one way or the other, Mr. Jackson," he replied. She stagger'd to her bearings, but the sails were new and good, And the ship smelt up to windward just as though she understood. As the winter's day was ending, in the entry of the night, We clear'd the weary headland, and pass'd below the light. And they heaved a mighty breath, every soul on board but me, As they saw her nose again pointing handsome out to sea; But all that I could think of, in the darkness and the cold, Was just that I was leaving home and my folks were growing old.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert L. Simpson on automobiles, belief, day, experience, fatherhood, heart, leadership, learning, men, needs, people, value, work, and world

I believe with all my heart that the true value of a man is not in the man who can do the work of ten men, but rather in that man who can get ten men to work. I think this is where Heavenly Father recognizes the great value of a leader, not particularly in the man who can do the work of ten, but the man who can get ten men to respond and to do what needs to be done. I remember the story of the assembly line. There was a man back in Detroit putting hub caps on new automobiles. He became the best man on the line. He had been putting hub caps on for ten years. One day the boss came by and said, "How are things going?" "Well, I am glad you dropped by. I think I deserve a raise. I am the best man on this line. Do you realize I have ten years' experience putting hub caps on?" The boss smiled and said, "No, George. You have one year's experience ten times. It doesn't take ten years' experience to learn how to put on a hub cap." Young people, think about that for a moment. If you find yourself down in a rut putting on hub caps, and you think you have got ten years' experience, you get out of that rut, and you reach out into other areas. You learn how to do new things, and you become useful in this world that we live in.

Robert L. Simpson (1915 -)

Source: at BYU, April 20, 1965., © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Fulghum on automobiles, driving, fatherhood, motherhood, perception, privacy, secrets, talent, and teaching

When my father finally got around to teaching me to drive, he was impressed at my "natural" talent for driving, not knowing that I had already been secretly driving my mother's car around the neighborhood. When I took the test and got my license and my father gave me my own set of keys to the car one night at dinner, it was a major rite of passage for him and my mother. Their perception of me had changed and was formally acknowledged. For me the occasion meant a private sanction to do in public what I had already been doing in secret.

Robert Fulghum (1937 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert D. Hales on blessings, fatherhood, and life

How we conduct ourselves in this life will determine what we will be in all the eternities to come. To receive the blessings of the sealing that our Heavenly Father has given to us, we have to keep the commandments and conduct ourselves in such a way that our families will want to live with us in the eternities.

Robert D. Hales (1924 -)

Source: Friend December, 1996, “They Spoke to Us” © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert D. Hales on caring, clarity, fatherhood, learning, motherhood, respect, and sister

I learned respect for womanhood from my father's tender caring for my mother, my sister, and his sisters. Father was the first to arise from dinner to clear the table. My sister and I would wash and dry the dishes each night at Father's request. If we were not there, Father and Mother would clean the kitchen together.

Robert D. Hales (1924 -)

Source: Friend December, 1993, “They Spoke to Us” © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on fatherhood and sons

Diogenes struck the father when the son swore.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard L. Evans on fatherhood

There's no pillow quite so soft as a father's strong shoulder.

Richard L. Evans (1906 - 1971)

Contributed by: Zaady

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