fatherhood

A Quote by JIm Valvano on father, fathers day, fatherhood, gift, and belief

My father gave me the greatest gift anyone could give another person, he believed in me.

JIm Valvano

Contributed by: Meenakshi

A Quote by William Wordsworth on beginning, birth, children, day, death, dreams, earth, fatherhood, glory, god, heart, heaven, home, joy, lies, life, nature, past, perception, sleep, soul, time, travel, vision, wishes, and youth

"My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So it was when my life began; So it is now I am a man; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The Child is Father of the Man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety." There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream, The earth, and every common sight, To me did seem Apparelled in celestial light, The glory and the freshness of a dream, It is not now as it hath been of yore ;- Turn whereso'er I may, By night or day, The things which I have seen I now can see no more. . . . . But yet I know, where'er I go, That there hath past away a glory from the earth. . . . . Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting; The Soul that rises with us, our life's Star, Hath had elsewhere its setting, And cometh from afar: Not in entire forgetfulness, And not in utter nakedness, But trailing clouds of glory do we come From God, who is our home: Heaven lies about us in our infancy! Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing Boy, But He beholds the light, and whence it flows, And sees it in his joy; The Youth, who daily farther from the east Must travel, still is Nature's Priest, And by the vision splendid Is on his way attended; At length the Man perceives it die away, And fade into the light of common day.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: “Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood”

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on beginning, children, death, fatherhood, heart, life, and wishes

My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So was it whaen my life began; So is it now I am a man; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The child is father of the man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: My heart leaps up, 1907

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Symonds on admiration, cleverness, company, day, diversity, fatherhood, god, history, liberty, life, people, and world

William Symonds, in his 1612 history of the Virginia colonies, also omits the Pocahontas episode, relating instead that Smith secured his release through his own clever connivance: "A month those Barbarians kept him prisoner, many strange triumphes and conjurations they made of him, yet hee so demeaned himselfe amongst them, as he not only diverted them from surprising the Fort, but procured his owne liberty, and got himselfe and his company such estimation amongst them, that those Salvages admired him as a demi-God. ...So he had inchanted those poor soules (being their prisoner) in demonstrating unto them the roundnesse of the world, the course of the moone and starres, the cause of the day and night the largenes of the seas the quallities of our ships, shot and powder, The devision of the world, with the diversity of people, their complexions, customs and conditions. All which he fained to be under the command of Captaine Newport, whom he tearmed to them his father; of whose arrival, it chanced he so directly prophesied, as they esteemed him an oracle; by these fictions he not only saved his owne life, and obtained his liberty, but had them at that command, he might command what he listed."

William Symonds

Source: The Proceedings of the English Colonies in Virginia..., 1612

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on children and fatherhood

It is a wise father that knows his own child.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Merchant of Venice

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, death, duty, earth, fatherhood, faults, grief, heart, heaven, impatience, losing, love, mind, nature, nobility, obligation, reason, simplicity, sons, sorrow, understanding, vulgarity, and world

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet, To give these mourning duties to your father: But, you must know, your father lost a father; That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound In filial obligation for some term To do obsequious sorrow: but to persever In obstinate condolement is a course Of impious stubbornness; 'tis unmanly grief; It shows a will most incorrect to heaven, A heart unfortified, a mind impatient, An understanding simple and unschool'd: For what we know must be and is as common As any the most vulgar thing to sense, Why should we in our peevish opposition Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature, To reason most absurd: whose common theme Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried, From the first corse till he that died to-day, 'This must be so.' We pray you, throw to earth This unprevailing woe, and think of us As of a father: for let the world take note, You are the most immediate to our throne; And with no less nobility of love Than that which dearest father bears his son, Do I impart toward you.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William R. Bradford on entertainment, fatherhood, home, learning, people, worth, and path

Young people must learn that none of the exciting and entertaining fun things are worth it if they take you off the path that will lead you back home to your Heavenly Father.

William R. Bradford (1933 -)

Source: Friend June, 1992, “They Spoke to Us” © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Penn on fatherhood and wisdom

He who is taught to live upon little owes more to his father's wisdom than he who has a great deal left him does to his father's care.

William Penn (1644 - 1718)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Henry Drummond on beauty, birth, earth, eternity, fatherhood, food, glory, god, gold, good, heaven, joy, love, mankind, power, reason, salvation, songs, soul, truth, and world

Bright portals of the sky, Emboss'd with sparkling stars, Doors of eternity, With diamantine bars, Your arras rich uphold, Loose all your bolts and springs, Ope wide your leaves of gold, That in your roofs may come the King of Kings. O well-spring of this All! Thy Father's image vive; Word, that from nought did call What is, doth reason, live; The soul's eternal food, Earth's joy, delight of heaven; All truth, love, beauty, good: To thee, to thee be praises ever given! O glory of the heaven! O sole delight of earth! To thee all power be given, God's uncreated birth! Of mankind lover true, Indearer of his wrong, Who doth the world renew, Still be thou our salvation and our song!

William Henry Drummond (1854 - 1907)

Source: “Christmas Day”

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Dean on assumptions, baseball, brothers, christianity, complaints, difficulty, evil, facts, fatherhood, faults, integrity, justice, learning, life, meaning, nature, needs, reflection, sons, theology, trade, and words

Bernard Loomer's father was a sea captain. He was acquainted with his small place in an uncontrollable nature. In a talk in 1974 Loomer described his father's instructions about the uses of a baseball glove. The father had just overheard his son's sandlot complaints about the thinness of a glove inherited from his older brothers. When his father asked him what a baseball glove was for, young Loomer had said that it was to protect the hand. In the words of Bernard Loomer in his sixties, his father replied: Son, I never have played baseball, but it seems to me you ought to be able to catch the ball bare-handed. The way I look at it, you use a glove not to protect your hand, but to give you a bigger hand to help catch balls that are more difficult to reach. I assume that in this as in all walks of life there are tricks to the trade. I suggest you learn how to catch with that glove for two reasons. First, because you are not going to get another one, and second, because you don't need protection from life. You need a glove to give you a bigger hand to catch baseballs you might otherwise miss. As the decade of the 1970s progressed, Loomer reflected increasingly on the fact that what you might otherwise miss [in theology] was irrational, even evil, but [that it] must be caught anyway. Loomer grew increasingly dissatisfied with those who seemed to restrict their reach-even Whitehead was faulted. And increasingly it appeared that Christian theology was the theology Loomer had-that he was not going to get another one-and so, although it was thin in places, he attempted to use the one theology he had, to catch all he could. [This] suggests the meaning of Loomer's special term, "size." Size signifies "the volume of life you can take into your being and still maintain your integrity."

William Dean

Source: The Size of God, 1987

Contributed by: Zaady

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