fashion

A Quote by Octave Mirbeau on obligation, respect, institutions, fashion, convention, moral, social, foundation, contradiction, formality, conflict, intolerable, poisoned, wound, powers, and personality

You're obliged to pretend respect for people and institutions you think absurd.  You live attached in a cowardly fashion to moral and social conventions you despise, condemn, and know lack all foundation.  It is that permanent contradiction between your ideas and desires and all the dead formalities and vain pretenses of your civilization which makes you sad, troubled and unbalanced.  In that intolerable conflict you lose all joy of life and all feeling of personality, because at every moment they suppress and restrain and check the free play of your powers.  That's the poisoned and mortal wound of the civilized world. 

Octave Mirbeau

Source: Torture Garden

Contributed by: bajarbattu

A Quote by Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel on fashion

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"Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening."

Coco Chanel (1883 - 1970)

Contributed by: Amanda

A Quote by Quentin Crisp on fashion, know yourself, and individuality

Fashion is what you adopt when you don't know who you are.

Quentin Crisp (1908 -)

Source: www.quotegarden.com

Contributed by: Anu

A Quote by Morihei Ueshiba on fashion

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Iron is full of impurities that weaken it; through forging, it becomes steel and is transformed into a razor-sharp sword. Human beings develop in the same fashion.

Morihei Ueshiba

Source: The Art of Peace

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wayne Dyer on fashion, intelligence, purpose, and universe

Everything in the universe has a purpose. Indeed, the invisible intelligence that flows through everything in a purposeful fashion is also flowing through you.

Wayne Dyer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Makepeace Thackeray on bravery and fashion

Bravery never goes out of fashion.

William Thackeray (1811 - 1863)

Source: The Four Georges.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art, duty, fashion, good, promotion, service, and world

O good old man, how well in thee appears The constant service of the antique world, When service sweat for duty, not for meed! Thou art not for the fashion of these times, Where none will sweat but for promotion, And having that do choke their service up Even with the having. . . .

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, act 2, scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William S. Ogdon on art, birds, character, clarity, conscience, contentment, control, determination, discovery, economics, effort, enemies, ethics, fashion, goodness, government, happiness, heart, individuality, life, listening, luxury, money,

The Art of Happiness There was never a time when so much official effort was being expended to produce happiness, and probably never a time when so little attention was paid by the individual to creating and personal qualities that make for it. What one misses most today is the evidence of widespread personal determination to develop a character that will, in itself, given any reasonable odds, make for happiness. Our whole emphasis is on the reform of living conditions, of increased wages, of controls on the economic structure-the government approach-and so little on man improving himself. The ingredients of happiness are so simple that they can be counted on one hand. Happiness comes from within, and rests most securely on simple goodness and clear conscience. Religion may not be essential to it, but no one ins known to have gained it without a philosophy resting on ethical principles. Selfishness is its enemy; to make another happy is to be happy one's self. It is quiet, seldom found for long in crowds, most easily won in moments of solitude and reflection. It cannot be bought; indeed, money has very little to do with it. No one is happy unless he is reasonably well satisfied with himself, so that the quest for tranquility must of necessity begin with self-examination. We shall not often be content with what we discover in this scrutiny. There is much to do, and so little done. Upon this searching self-analysis, however, depends the discovery of those qualities that make each man unique, and whose development alone can bring satisfaction. Of all those who have tried, down the ages, to outline a program for happiness, few have succeeded so well as William Henry Channing, chaplain of the House of Representatives in the middle of the last century: "To live content with small means; so seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy . . . to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to the stars and birds, to babes and sages, with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasions, hurry never; in a word to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common." It will be noted that no government can do this for you; you must do it for yourself.

William S. Ogdon

Source: New York Times, Editorial Page, Dec. 30, 1945

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Henry Channing on birds, contentment, fashion, heart, listening, luxury, spirituality, and study

To live content with small means; to seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy, not respectable, and wealthy, not rich; to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to stars and birds, babes and sages with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasions, hurry never. In a word, to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common. This is to be my symphony.

William Henry Channing (1810 - 1884)

Source: My Symphony

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Edmondstoune Aytoun on anger, fashion, god, judgment, lies, and soul

Do not lift him from the bracken, Leave him lying where he fell- Better bier ye cannot fashion: None beseems him half so well As the bare and broken heather, And the hard and trampled sod, Whence his angry soul ascended To the judgment seat of God!

William Edmondstoune Aytoun (1813 - 1965)

Source: The Widow of Glencoe

Contributed by: Zaady

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