family

A Quote by Phyllis McGinley on borrowing, brides, children, christianity, fame, family, fatherhood, faults, generosity, gold, hunger, love, luck, motherhood, patience, poetry, problems, relatives, saints, sharing, sister, soul, thinking, and wine

The subject of the poem was Bridget of Kildare (450-523), a Christian lass among the Druids in Ireland. Saint Bridget was A problem child. Although a lass Demure and mild, And one who strove To please her dad, Saint Bridget drove The family mad. For here's the fault in Bridget lay: She WOULD give everything away. To any soul Whose luck was out She'd give her bowl Of stirabout; She'd give her shawl, Divide her purse With one or all. And what was worse, When she ran out of things to give She'd borrow from a relative. Her father's gold, Her grandsire's dinner, She'd hand to cold and hungry sinner; Give wine, give meat, No matter whose; Take from her feet The very shoes, And when her shoes had gone to others, Fetch forth her sister's and her mother's. She could not quit. She had to share; Gave bit by bit The silverware, The barnyard geese, The parlor rug, Her little niece-'s christening mug, Even her bed to those in want, And then the mattress of her aunt. An easy touch For poor and lowly, She gave so much And grew so holy That when she died Of years and fame, The countryside Put on her name, And still the Isles of Erin fidget With generous girls named Bride or Bridget. Well, one must love her. Nonetheless, In thinking of her Givingness, There's no denial She must have been A sort of trial Unto her kin. The moral, too, seems rather quaint. WHO had the patience of a saint, From evidence presented here? Saint Bridget? Or her near and dear?

Phyllis McGinley (1905 - 1978)

Source: "The Giveaway," from The Love Letters ofd Phyllis McGinley, New York, Viking Press, 1957

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Norman R. Augustine on cities, daughters, driving, family, logic, perception, problems, solution, technology, and trying

Too often technology is perceived as the problem rather than the solution; as something to be avoided rather than embraced. This is about as logical as my daughter's observing, while our family was driving through an unfamiliar city, "Trying to read a map while driving causes all the traffic lights to turn green."

Norman R. Augustine (1935 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on absence, advice, attitude, church, circumstances, correction, facts, family, fear, force, friendship, giving, heart, leadership, listening, losing, love, past, pride, resentment, solution, and truth

In moments of truth, when meekness matters, other forces, including pride, flow into the chemistry of that moment. Take, for instance, the matter of receiving correct counsel, whether given by a spouse, a family member, a friend, or a Church leader. Often the counsel, even when spoken in love, is resisted by the recipient who - chained by pride - focuses instead upon the imperfections of the person giving the counsel. In another situation, the recipient may have much pride in the position he or she has already taken and refuse to deny himself or herself the continuation of that conduct, lifestyle, or attitude, which denial is at the heart of the solution. However, those who fear losing face cannot have His image in their countenances. In yet another circumstance, the recipient may, instead of listening to the counsel given, be nursing some past grievance upon which he or she would prefer to focus rather than the real issue at hand. Neither advice-giver nor circumstances can be perfect. Absent mutual meekness, the counsel given may not only go unheeded, but, in fact, may even be resented. Italics added.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Meek and Lowly, p. 57., © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on control, family, history, home, mankind, men, military, time, and women

When the real history of mankind is fully disclosed, will it feature the echoes of gunfire or the shaping sound of lullabies? The great armistices made by military men of the peacemaking of women in home and in neighborhoods? Will what happened in cradles and kitchens prove to be more controlling than what happened in congresses? When the surf of the centuries has made the great pyramids so much sand, the everlasting family will still be standing, because it is a celestial institution, formed outside telestial time.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Ensign, May 1978, p. 10. © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on family, friendship, literature, pleasure, and writing

The only sensible ends of literature are, first, the pleasurable toil of writing; second, the gratification of one's family and friends; and, lastly, the solid cash.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The Routledge Dictionary of Quotations

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lady Nancy Astor on birthday, death, family, and illness

When she woke briefly during her last illness and found all her family around her bedside: Am I dying or is this my birthday?

Nancy Astor (1879 - 1964)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mother Teresa on divorce, family, good, happiness, love, soul, and unity

On the British Royal Divorce (Charles and Dianna). She is such a sad soul. It is good that it is over. Nobody was happy anyhow. I know I should preach family love and unity, but in their case. . . .

Mother Teresa (1910 - 1998)

Source: 1996

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Minnie Maddern Fiske on anxiety, danger, family, and friendship

Among the most disheartening and dangerous of . . . advisors, you will often find those closest to you, your dearest friends, members of your own family, perhaps, loving, anxious, and knowing nothing whatever . . .

Minnie Maddern Fiske (1865 - 1932)

Source: Mrs. Fiske, by Alexander Woollcott, 1917.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marvin J. Ashton on appearance, economics, family, good, heart, prophets, and time

We ... tend to evaluate others on the basis of physical, outward appearance: their "good looks," their social status, their family pedigrees, their degrees, or their economic situations. The Lord, however, has a different standard by which he measures a person. When it came time to choose a king to replace King Saul, the Lord gave this criteria to his prophet Samuel: "Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature; ... for the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart."

Marvin J. Ashton (1915 - 1994)

Source: Friend December, 1988, “They Spoke to Us” © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marvin J. Ashton on achievement, awareness, belief, brothers, children, church, criticism, destruction, devil, doubt, failure, family, flaws, friendship, giving, hatred, hope, love, men, needs, neighbors, patience, progress, sister, success, s

None of us need one more person bashing or pointing out where we have failed or fallen short. Most of us are already well aware of the areas in which we are weak. What each of us does need is family, friends, employers, and brothers and sisters who support us, who have the patience to teach us, who believe in us, and who believe we're trying to do the best we can, in spite of our weaknesses. What ever happened to giving each other the benefit of the doubt? What ever happened to hoping that another person would succeed or achieve? What ever happened to rooting for each other? [Satan's] tactic is stirring up hatred among the children of men. He loves to see us criticize each other, make fun or take advantage of our neighbor's known flaws, and generally pick on each other. There will always be those in the days ahead who will be inclined to bash ourselves and others, but we cannot allow a heavy, crushing blow to destroy us or deter our personal or church progress.

Marvin J. Ashton (1915 - 1994)

Source: Ensign, May 1992 p. 18.

Contributed by: Zaady

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