familiarity

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on enemies, familiarity, and friendship

Be civil to all; sociable to many; familiar with few; friend to one; enemy to none.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: Poor Richard’s Almanac, June 1741.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on change, earth, familiarity, and fatherhood

Aristotle's geographical speculations anticipated by almost two thousand years the rationale behind Columbus' voyage. Ferdinand Columbus suggested that his father was familiar with the following passage: "Again, our observations of the stars make it evident, not only that the earth is circular, but also that it is a circle of no great size. For quite a small change of position to south or north causes a manifest alteration of the horizon. There is much change, I mean, in the stars which are overhead, and the stars seen are different, as one moves northward or southward. . . . All of which goes to show not only that the earth is circular in shape, but that it is a sphere of no great size: for otherwise the effect of so slight a change of place would not be so quickly apparent. Hence, one should not be too sure of the incredibility of the view of those who conceive that there is a continuity between the parts about the pillars of Hercules [the strait of Gibraltar] and the parts about India, and that in this way the ocean is one."

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Source: De Caelo, Fourth Century B.C.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Andrea Dworkin on familiarity, fear, time, and women

By the time we are women, fear is as familiar to us as air; it is our element. We live in it, we inhale it, we exhale it, and most of the time we do not even notice it. Instead of "I am afraid," we say, "I don't want to," or "I don't know how," or "I can't."

Andrea Dworkin (1946 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by André Ernest Modeste Gretry on certainty, familiarity, order, and rules

There must be deviations from the rules in order to express almost anything....However, only the man who is familiar with the rules may sometimes violate them, for he alone can know that, in certain cases, the rule is not enough.

Andre Ernest Modeste Gretry (1741 - 1813)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on facts, familiarity, giving, god, immortality, and sacred

SCARABAEUS, n. The sacred beetle of the ancient Egyptians, allied to our familiar "tumble-bug." It was supposed to symbolize immortality, the fact that God knew why giving it its peculiar sanctity.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on familiarity, innocence, nature, and punishment

PLAGUE, n. In ancient times a general punishment of the innocent for admonition of their ruler, as in the familiar instance of Pharaoh the Immune. The plague today . . . is merely Nature's fortuitous manifestation of her purposeless objectionableness.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on familiarity, gold, kindness, and nobility

PALM, n. A species of tree . . . of which the familiar "itching palm" ("Palma hominis") is most widely distributed . . . . This noble vegetable exudes a kind of invisible gum, which may be detected by applying to the bark a piece of gold or silver.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on certainty, familiarity, and knowledge

IGNORAMUS, n. A person unacquainted with certain kinds of knowledge familiar to yourself, and having certain other kinds that you know nothing about.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on familiarity and garden

CABBAGE, n. A familiar kitchen-garden vegetable about as large and wise as a man's head.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on familiarity, mankind, and mind

Familiar things happen, and mankind does not bother about them. It requires a very unusual mind to undertake the analysis of the obvious.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: Science and the Modern World.

Contributed by: Zaady

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