fame

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on achievement, enemies, fame, fortune, love, principles, and self-love

Self-love is almost always the ruling principle of our friendships. It makes us avoid all our obligations in unprofitable situations, and even causes us to forget our hostility towards our enemies when they become powerful enough to help us achieve fame or fortune.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mae West on books, cinema, fame, life, and men

"It's not the men in your life that counts, it's the life in your men." Number Three in the Top Ten Most Famous Movie Quotes. -The Guinness Book of Film

Mae West (1892 - 1980)

Source: I'm No Angel, 1933.

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A Quote by Louisa May Alcott on fame and struggle

Fame is a pearl many dive for and only a few bring up. Even when they do, it is not perfect, and they sigh for more, and lose better things in struggling for them.

Louisa May Alcott (1832 - 1888)

Source: Jo's Boys, 1886.

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A Quote by Leonard Cohen on fame, heart, pity, reality, suffering, and work

It's a pity if someone... has to console himself for the wreck of his days with the notion that somehow his voice, his work embodies the deepest, most obscure, freshest, rawest oyster of reality in the unfathomable refrigerator of the heart's ocean, but I am such a one, and there you have it. ... It is really amazing how famous I am to those few who truly comprehend what I'm about. I am the Voice of Suffering and I cannot be consoled

Leonard Cohen

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Josiah Quincy on ability, anecdotes, approval, argument, cities, conversation, day, determination, fame, good, journeys, justice, laws, lawyers, libraries, money, preparation, presidency, time, and work

Josiah Quincy, one-time mayor of Boston and president of Harvard University, recalled: "I will repeat an anecdote which I think Daniel Webster gave at a dinner, though, as I made no note of it, it is just possible that he told it in my presence at some later date. The conversation was running upon the importance of doing small things thoroughly and with the full measure of one's ability. This Webster illustrated by an account of some petty insurance case that was brought to him when a young lawyer in Portsmouth. Only a small amount was involved, and a twenty-dollar fee was all that was promised. "He saw that, to do his clients full justice, a journey to Boston, to consult the law library, would be desirable. He would be out of pocket by such an expedition, and for his time he would receive no adequate compensation. After a little hesitation he determined to do his very best, cost cost what it might. He accordingly went to Boston looked up the authorities, and gained the case. "Years after this, Webster, then famous, was passing through New York City. An important insurance case was to be tried the day after his arrival, and one of the counsel had been suddenly taken ill. Money was no object, and Webster was begged to name his terms and conduct the case. " 'I told them,' Mr. Webster, 'that it was preposterous to prepare a legal argument at a few hours' notice. They insisted, however, that I should look at the papers; and this after some demur, I consented to do. Well, it was my old twenty-dollar case over again, and as I never forget anything, I had all the authorities at my fingers' ends. The Court knew that I had no time to prepare, and was astonished at the range of my acquirements. So, you see, I was handsomely paid both in fame and money for that journey to Boston; and the moral is that good work is rewarded in the end, though, to be sure, one's self-approval should be enough.'"

Josiah Quincy (1744 - 1775)

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A Quote by John Wolcot on fame

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What rage for fame attends both great and small! Better be damned than mentioned not at all.

John Wolcot (1738 - 1819)

Source: To the Royal Academicians.

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A Quote by John Milton on age, fame, honor, memory, needs, sons, and weakness

What needs my Shakespeare for his honour'd bones,-- The labour of an age in piled stones? Or that his hallow'd relics should be hid Under a star-y-pointing pyramid? Dear son of memory, great heir of fame, What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name?

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Epitaph on Shakespeare.

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A Quote by John Milton on fame

in

Thence to the famous orators repair, Those ancient, whose resistless eloquence Wielded at will that fierce democratie, Shook the arsenal, and fulmin'd over Greece, To Macedon, and Artaxerxes' throne.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Regained. Book iv. Line 267.

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A Quote by John Milton on clarity, fame, and spirit

Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

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A Quote by John Milton on admiration, bravery, fame, god, hope, learning, life, men, study, and virtue

Enflamed with the study of learning and the admiration of virtue; stirred up with high hopes of living to be brave men and worthy patriots, dear to God, and famous to all ages.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Tractate of Education.

Contributed by: Zaady

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