fame

A Quote by Norman Cousins on birth, books, fame, history, ideas, libraries, life, literature, metaphor, and worship

The library is not a shrine for the worship of books. It is not a temple where literary incense must be burned or where one's one devotion to the bound book is expressed in ritual. A library, to modify the famous metaphor of Socrates, should be the delivery room for the birth of ideas - a place where history comes to life.

Norman Cousins (1912 - 1990)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nicolò Paganini on composers, fame, friendship, popularity, time, and writing

On December 12, 1829, Paganini wrote his friend Germi: "The variations I've composed on the graceful Neapolitan ditty, 'Oh Mamma, Mama Cara,' outshine everything. I can't describe it!" He was writing from Karlsruhe, in the midst of his triumphal tour through Germany. That letter marks the earliest known mention of the variations that would become famous as "The Carnival of Venice." At the time of his letter, Paganini had already performed the piece in at least four concerts. From then on, it would be one of his most popular compositions.

Nicolo Paganini (1782 - 1840)

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A Quote by Mary A. Ford on brothers, change, death, dreams, earth, eternity, fame, fatherhood, freedom, future, god, gold, heart, life, love, past, patience, peace, praise, progress, rest, shame, sorrow, soul, struggle, time, truth, universe, war, wilder

A HUNDRED YEARS FROM NOW The surging sea of human life forever onward rolls, And bears to the eternal shore its daily freight of souls; Tbough bravely sails our bark today, pale Death sits at the prow, And few shall know we ever lived a hundred years from now. O mighty human brotherhood Why fiercely war and strive, While God's great world has ample space for everything alive? Broad fields uncultured and unclaimed are waiting for the plow Of progress that shall make them bloom a hundred years from now. Why should we try so earnestly in life's short, narrow span, On golden stairs to climb so high above our brother man? Why blindly at an earthly shrine in slavish homage bow? Our gold will rust, ourselves be dust, a hundred years from now. Why prize so much the world's applause? Why dread so much its blame? A fleeting echo is its voice of censure or of fame; The praise that thrills the heart, the scom that dyes with shame the brow, Will be as long-forgotten dreams a hundred years from now. O patient hearts, that meekly bear your weary load of wrongl O earnest hearts, that bravely dare, and striving, grow more strong! Press on till perfect peace is won; you'll never dream of how You struggled o'er life's thorny road a hundred years from now. Grand, lofty souls, who live and toil that freedom, right and truth Alone may rule the universe, for you is endless youth. When 'mid the blest with God you rest, the grateful land shall bow Above your clay in reverent love a hundred years from now. Earth's empires rise and fall. Time! like breakers on thy shore They rush upon thy rocks of doom, go down, and are no more. The starry wilderness of worlds that gem night's radiant brow Will light the skies for other eyes a hundred years from now. Our Father, to whose sleepless eye the past and future stand An open page, like babes we cling to Tby protecting hand; Change, sorrow, death, are naught to us, if we may safely bow Beneath the shadow of Thy throne a hundred years from now.

Mary A. Ford

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A Quote by Mark Twain on accidents, certainty, fame, and popularity

Fame is a vapor; popularity an accident; the only earthly certainty is oblivion.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

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A Quote by Marian Botsford Fraser on absence, abuse, boldness, censorship, citizenship, criticism, danger, execution, fame, fear, freedom, government, human rights, ignorance, life, obedience, politics, privacy, religion, silence, uncertainty, weapons, a

Censorship is almost systematically the weapon of first resort for governments in uncertain political situations. So not only are the famous writers and bold journalists in danger; at every level of public and private life, the freedoms to think, read or write are denied. In the absence of a free press, other human rights abuses flourish unabated. Nothing is reported, criticized, questioned. The example of imprisonment, torture or execution imposes a further silence. A blindly obedient mob mentality is encouraged, driven by extremist religious or ethnic loyalties. The citizens do not know what is happening. Fear and ignorance permeate discussion.

Marian Botsford Fraser

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A Quote by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus on fame, fortune, life, soul, and time

In man's life, time is but a moment; being, a flux; sense is dim; the material frame corruptible; soul, an eddy of breath; fortune a thing inscrutable, and fame precarious.

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180)

Source: To Himself

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A Quote by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus on fame and life

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As for life, it is a battle and a sojourning in a strange land; but the fame that comes after is oblivion.

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180)

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A Quote by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus on fame and life

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Life is a warfare and a stranger's sojourn, and after fame is oblivion.

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180)

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A Quote by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus on fame

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All is ephemeral - fame and the famous as well.

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180)

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A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on cities, courage, earth, enemies, fame, feeling, heaven, and mountains

Capture of Nanking Rain and a windstorm rage blue and yellow over Chung the bell mountain as a million peerless troops cross the Great River. The peak is a coiled dragon, the city a crouching tiger more dazzling than before. The sky is spinning and the earth upside down. We are elated yet we must use our courage to chase the hopeless enemy. We must not stoop to fame like the overlord Hsiang Yu. If heaven has feeling it will grow old and watch our seas turn into mulberry fields. April 1949

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: The Poems of Mao Tse-tung, Harper & Row

Contributed by: Zaady

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