fame

A Quote by Robert Burton on fame

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Every schoolboy hath that famous testament of Grunnius Corocotta Porcellus at his fingers' end.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

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A Quote by Robert Burns on fame and path

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Critics! Those cut-throat bandits in the paths of fame.

Robert Burns (1759 - 1796)

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A Quote by Robert Armstrong on adventure, fame, and money

It's money and adventure and fame. It's the thrill of a lifetime and a long sea voyage that starts at six o'clock tomorrow morning.

Robert Armstrong

Source: As Carl Denham, fearless adventure filmmaker/producer, preparing an expedition, King Kong 1933

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A Quote by Richard L. Evans on creativity, fame, gifts, lies, life, museums, principles, service, teaching, theory, thinking, time, and work

I am thinking of the Danish sculptor of great fame, Thorvaldsen, who chose to be buried in the midst of his work-not in a cathedral or a cemetery, but in a museum among the monuments of his own making- in the midst of his statuary; and there what he made and what he did with his life surrounds him. He did not theorize upon sculpturing, only, but with his hands and with his creative gift he fashioned those things and he lies there in the midst of his works, as we all shall do someday-and it will not be the theories or the discussions or the speculations or the set of principles or the set of commandments that shall save us. We shall be no better than we are. We are no better than the tithing we pay, no better than the teaching we do, no better than the service we give, no better than the commandments we keep, no better than the lives we live, and we shall have a bright remembrance of these things and we shall, in a sense, lie down in the midst of what we have done when that time comes.

Richard L. Evans (1906 - 1971)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on fame

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The martyr cannot be dishonored. Every lash inflicted is a tongue of fame; every prison a more illustrious abode.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on authors, books, fame, and learning

The book written against fame and learning has the author's name on the title-page.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on fame, people, and proof

Fame is proof that the people are gullible.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on fame, friendship, good, heart, love, and planning

Give all to love: Obey thy heart; Friends, kindred, days, Estate, good fame, Plans, credit, and the Muse,- Nothing refuse.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Source: Give All to Love

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on eternity, fame, god, literature, names, reputation, risk, and science

When God lets loose a great thinker on this planet, then all things are at risk. - There is not a piece of science, but its flank my be turned to-morrow; nor any literary reputation, nor the so-called eternal names of fame, that may not be revised and condemned.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Phyllis McGinley on borrowing, brides, children, christianity, fame, family, fatherhood, faults, generosity, gold, hunger, love, luck, motherhood, patience, poetry, problems, relatives, saints, sharing, sister, soul, thinking, and wine

The subject of the poem was Bridget of Kildare (450-523), a Christian lass among the Druids in Ireland. Saint Bridget was A problem child. Although a lass Demure and mild, And one who strove To please her dad, Saint Bridget drove The family mad. For here's the fault in Bridget lay: She WOULD give everything away. To any soul Whose luck was out She'd give her bowl Of stirabout; She'd give her shawl, Divide her purse With one or all. And what was worse, When she ran out of things to give She'd borrow from a relative. Her father's gold, Her grandsire's dinner, She'd hand to cold and hungry sinner; Give wine, give meat, No matter whose; Take from her feet The very shoes, And when her shoes had gone to others, Fetch forth her sister's and her mother's. She could not quit. She had to share; Gave bit by bit The silverware, The barnyard geese, The parlor rug, Her little niece-'s christening mug, Even her bed to those in want, And then the mattress of her aunt. An easy touch For poor and lowly, She gave so much And grew so holy That when she died Of years and fame, The countryside Put on her name, And still the Isles of Erin fidget With generous girls named Bride or Bridget. Well, one must love her. Nonetheless, In thinking of her Givingness, There's no denial She must have been A sort of trial Unto her kin. The moral, too, seems rather quaint. WHO had the patience of a saint, From evidence presented here? Saint Bridget? Or her near and dear?

Phyllis McGinley (1905 - 1978)

Source: "The Giveaway," from The Love Letters ofd Phyllis McGinley, New York, Viking Press, 1957

Contributed by: Zaady

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