facts

A Quote by Stuart Kauffman on accidents, argument, effort, facts, fame, growth, history, justice, needs, order, plants, reflection, and understanding

Pick up a pinecone and count the spiral rows of scales. You may find eight spirals winding up to the left and 13 spirals winding up to the right, or 13 left and 21 right spirals, or other pairs of numbers. The striking fact is that these pairs of numbers are adjacent numbers in the famous Fibonacci series: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21. . . . Here, each term is the sum of the previous two terms. The phenomenon is well known and called phyllotaxis. Many are the efforts of biologists to understand why pinecones, sunflowers, and many other plants exhibit this remarkable pattern. Organisms do the strangest things, but all these odd things need not reflect selection or historical accident. Some of the best efforts to understand phyllotaxis appeal to a form of self-organization. Paul Green, at Stanford, has argued persuasively that the Fibonacci series is just what one would expect as the simplest self-repeating pattern that can be generated by the particular growth processes in the growing tips of the tissues that form sunflowers, pinecones, and so forth. Like a snowflake and its sixfold symmetry, the pinecone and its phyllotaxis may be part of order for free . . .

Stuart Kauffman

Source: Stuart Kauffman in At Home in the Universe, Oxford University Press, 1995, p 151.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on birth, destiny, facts, life, possibility, purpose, time, and understanding

One of the significant facts about the moment of birth is that it is an unconscious moment. No one ever knows when he is being born that the event is actually taking place, and sometimes we don't find out about it until quite a long time afterward. Sometimes, we never do really find out that we have been born. So frequently, we don't know why we were born; we don't know where we came from; we don't know what the purpose of life is; nor do we understand the possibilities of our godly destiny.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: General Conference, April 1975

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on change and facts

Face the facts of being what you are, for that is what changes what you are.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on discrimination, facts, god, and understanding

The absurd . . . the fact that with God all things are possible. The absurd is not one of the factors which can be discriminated within the proper compass of the understanding: it is not identical with the improbable, the unexpected, the unforeseen.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on danger, despair, facts, ignorance, individuality, spirit, and truth

Compared with the person who is conscious of his despair, the despairing individual who is ignorant of his despair is simply a negativity further away from the truth and deliverance. . . . Yet ignorance is so far from breaking the despair or changing despair to nondespairing that it can in fact be the most dangerous form of despair. . . . An individual is furthest from being conscious of himself as spirit when he is ignorant of being in despair. But precisely this-not to be conscious of oneself as spirit-is despair, which is spiritlessness. . . .

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on facts and spirit

Man is spirit. But what is spirit? Spirit is the self. But what is the self? The self is a relation which relates itself to its own self or it is that (which accounts for it) that the relation relates itself to its own self; the self is not the relation but (consists in the fact) that the relation relates itself to its own self.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on christianity, existence, facts, faith, god, paradox, relationships, and truth

The paradox in Christian truth is invariably due to the fact that it is the truth that exists for God. The standard of measure and the end is superhuman; and there is only one relationship possible: faith.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE JOURNALS

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sogyal Rinpoche on absence, desires, egotism, existence, facts, fiction, ideas, interest, irony, knowledge, needs, suffering, survival, and thought

So ego, then, is the absence of true knowledge of who we really are, together with its result: a doomed clutching on, at all costs, to a cobbled together and makeshift image of ourselves, an inevitably chameleon charlatan self that keeps changing and has to, to keep alive the fiction of its existence. . . . Ego is then defined as incessant movements of grasping at a delusory notion of "I" and "mine," self and other, and all the concepts, ideas, desires, and activity that will sustain that false construction. . . . The fact that we need to grasp at all and go on and on grasping shows that in the depths of our being we know that the self does not inherently exist. . . . {The ego's greatest triumph} is to inveigle us into believing its best interests are our best interests, and even into identifying our very survival with its own. This is a savage irony, considering that ego and its grasping are at the root of all our suffering. Yet ego is so convincing, and we have been its dupe for so long, that the thought that we might ever become egoless terrifies us.

Sogyal Rinpoche

Source: Sogyal Rinpoche in The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, HarperCollins Publishers, 1993, p. 117

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Socrates on argument, body, death, desires, facts, judgment, knowledge, purity, soul, and wisdom

We are in fact convinced that if we are ever to have pure knowledge of anything, we must get rid of the body and contemplate things by themselves with the soul by itself. It seems, to judge from the argument, that the wisdom which we desire and upon which we profess to have set our hearts will be attainable only when we are dead and not in our lifetime.

Socrates (469 - 399 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Socrates on facts and ignorance

I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance.

Socrates (469 - 399 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

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