facts

A Quote by Albert Einstein on curiosity, facts, and miracles

It is, in fact, nothing short of a miracle that the modern methods of instruction have not yet entirely strangled the holy curiosity of inquiry.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Source: H. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Einstein on change, facts, and theory

If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert E. N. Gray on desires, facts, habits, lies, men, satisfaction, secrets, and success

Successful men are influenced by the desire for pleasing results. Failures are influenced by the desire for pleasing methods and are inclined to be satisfied with such results as can be obtained by doing things they like to do. The common denominator of success-the secret of every man who has ever been successful-lies in the fact that he formed the habit of doing things that failures don't like to do.

Albert E. N. Gray

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alan Watts on desires, facts, nature, and war

We are at war between consciousness and nature, between the desire for permanence and the fact of flux. It is ourself against ourselves.

Alan Watts (1915 - 1973)

Source: The Wisdom of Insecurity

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A Quote by Alan Greenspan on action, competition, crime, facts, government, judgment, laws, principles, world, and elightenment

The world of antitrust is reminiscent of Alice's Wonderland: everything seemingly is, yet apparently isn't, simultaneously. It is a world in which competition is lauded as the basic axiom and guiding principle, yet "too much" competition is condemned as "cutthroat." It is a world in which actions designed to limit competition are branded as criminal when taken by businessmen, yet praised as "enlightened" when initiated by the government. It is a world in which the law is so vague that businessmen have no way of knowing whether specific actions will be declared illegal until they hear the judge's verdict after the fact.

Alan Greenspan (1926 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alain René Lesage on facts

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Facts are stubborn things.

Alain Rene Lesage (1668 - 1747)

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A Quote by Alfred Jules Ayer on certainty, facts, logic, mathematics, principles, purity, purpose, questions, and virtue

A point which is not sufficiently brought out by Russell, if indeed it is recognized by him at all, is that every logical proposition is valid in its own right. Its validity does not depend upon its being incorporated in a system, and deduced from certain propositions which are taken as self-evident. The construction of systems of logic is useful as a means of discovering and certifying analytic propositions, but it is not in principle essential even for this purpose. For it is possible to conceive of a symbolism in which every analytic proposition could be seen to be analytic in virtue of its form alone. The fact that the validity of an analytic proposition in no way depends on its being deducible from other analytic propositions is our justification for disregarding the question whether the propositions of mathematics are reducible to propositions of formal logic, in the way that Russell supposed (1919, chap. 2). For even if it is the case that the definition of a cardinal number as a class of classes similar to a given class is circular, and it is not possible to reduce mathematical notions to purely logical notions, it will still remain true that the propositions of mathematics are analytic propositions. They will form a special class of analytic propositions, containing special terms, but they will be none the less analytic for that. For the criterion of an analytic proposition is that its validity should follow simply from the definition of the terms contained in it, and this condition is fulfilled by the propositions of pure mathematics.

A.J. Ayer

Source: Language Truth and Logic, Ayer, Ch.4, p.108

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A Quote by Alfred Jules Ayer on character, concern, consequences, facts, logic, philosophy, questions, and words

In other words, the propositions of philosophy are not factual, but linguistic in character - that is, they do not describe the behaviour of physical, or even mental, objects; they express definitions, or the formal consequences of definitions. Accordingly we may say that philosophy is a department of logic. For we will see that the characteristic mark of a purely logical enquiry, is that it is concerned with the formal consequences of our definitions and not with questions of empirical fact.

A.J. Ayer

Source: Language Truth and Logic, Ayer, Ch. 2, p.76

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on facts and words

Man does not live by words alone, despite the fact that he sometimes has to eat them.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

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A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on cooperation, facts, nations, politics, and world

I have been told that one of the reasons the astronomers of the world cooperate is the fact that there is no one nation from which the entire sphere of the sky can be seen. Perhaps there is in that fact a parable for national statesmen, whose political horizons are all too often limited by national horizons.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

Source: 1961

Contributed by: Zaady

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