exploring

A Quote by John William Gardner on difficulty, exploring, failure, fear, growth, learning, life, obstacles, personality, and personality

We pay a heavy price for our fear of failure. It is a powerful obstacle to growth. It assures the progressive narrowing of the personality and prevents exploration and experimentation. There is no learning without some difficulty and fumbling. If you want to keep on learning, you must keep on risking failure - all your life.

John William Gardner (1912 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James William Fulbright on action, dissent, exploring, fear, learning, possibility, thinking, and world

We must dare to think 'unthinkable' thoughts. We must learn to explore all the options and possibilities that confront us in a complex and rapidly changing world. We must learn to welcome and not to fear the voices of dissent. We must dare to think about 'unthinkable things' because when things become unthinkable, thinking stops and action becomes mindless.

J. William Fulbright (1905 - 1995)

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A Quote by Wilfred A. Peterson on adventure, art, belief, books, courage, curiosity, day, death, dreams, exploring, faith, friendship, heart, ideas, life, men, problems, reading, support, theory, and thinking

A man practices the art of adventure when he heroically faces up to life; When he has the daring to open doors to new experiences and to step boldly forth to explore strange horizons. When he is unafraid of new ideas, new theories and new philosophies. When he has the curiosity to experiment--to test and try new ways of living and thinking. When he has the flexibility to adjust and adapt himself to the changing patterns of life. When he refuses to seek safe places and easy tasks and has, instead, the courage to wrestle with the toughest problems. When he has the moral stamina to be steadfast in the support of those men in whom he has faith and those causes in which he believes. When he breaks the chain of routine and renews his life through reading new books, traveling to new places, making new friends, taking up new hobbies and adopting new viewpoints. When he has the nerve to move out of life's shallows and venture forth into the deep. When he keeps his heart young, his expectations high and never allows his dreams to die. When he concludes that a rut is only another name for the grave and that the only way to stay out of the ruts is by living adventurously and staying vitally alive every day of his life.

Wilfred A. Peterson

Source: The art of living, Albert W. Daw Collection

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A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on exploring and time

We shall not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive at what we started and know the place for the first time.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hanna on body, education, experience, and exploring

The human body is not an instrument to be used, but a realm of one's being to be experienced, explored, enriched and, thereby, educated.

Thomas Hanna

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A Quote by Sir John Denham on exploring, gold, guilt, and wealth

Though with those streams he no resemblance hold, Whose foam is amber and their gravel gold; His genuine and less guilty wealth t' explore, Search not his bottom, but survey his shore.

Sir John Denham (1615 - 1668)

Source: Cooper's Hill. Line 165.

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A Quote by Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington on assumptions, body, discovery, exploring, knowledge, life, observation, science, scientists, universe, and water

Let us suppose that an ichthyologist is exploring the life of the ocean. He casts a net into the water and brings up a fishy assortment. Surveying his catch, he proceeds in the usual manner of a scientist to systematize what it reveals. He arrives at two generalizations: (1) No sea-creature is less than two inches long. (2) All sea-creatures have gills. These are both true of his catch, and he assumes tentatively that they will remain true however often he repeats it. In applying this analogy, the catch stands for the body of knowledge which constitutes physical science, and the net for the sensory and intellectual equipment which we use in obtaining it. The casting of the net corresponds to observation; for knowledge which has not been or could not be obtained by observation is not admitted into physical science. An onlooker may object that the first generalization is wrong. "There are plenty of sea-creatures under two inches long, only your net is not adapted to catch them." The icthyologist dismisses this objection contemptuously. "Anything uncatchable by my net is ipso facto outside the scope of icthyological knowledge. In short, "what my net can't catch isn't fish." Or-to translate the analogy-"If you are not simply guessing, you are claiming a knowledge of the physical universe discovered in some other way than by the methods of physical science, and admittedly unverifiable by such methods. You are a metaphysician. Bah!"

Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington (1882 - 1944)

Source: The Philosophy of Physical Science, The University of Michigan Press, 1958

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A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on america, discovery, exploring, history, hope, and world

America was discovered accidentally by a great seaman who was looking for something else; when discovered it was not wanted; and most of the exploration for the next fifty years was done in the hope of getting through or around it. America was named after a man who discovered no part of the New World. History is like that, very chancy.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 2

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on exploring, heart, nations, patriotism, and purity

When a whole nation is roaring Patriotism at the top of its voice, I am fain to explore the cleanness of its hands and purity of its heart.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on exploring, nature, and people

When nature removes a great man, people explore the horizon for a successor; but none comes, and none will. His class is extinguished with him. In some other and quite different field, the next man will appear.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Source: Representative Men. 1850. Uses of Great Men

Contributed by: Zaady

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