exclusion

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, finite, infinite, other, essential, purity, relative, absolute, opposition, exclusion, and inclusion

It has to be understood that, even though the infinite or intrinsic or essential must be grasped in an "exclusionary" way (cleft apart or distinguished from the finite or extrinsic or accidental), ultimately the two domains belong together as a whole: it is only for the propadeutic purpose of self-clarification or enlightenment that the infinite must be grasped in its relative purity from the finite, a relation of opposition that may mistakenly make the infinite look as finite (oppositional, exclusionary) as the finite (since it is of the essence of the finite to stand in a relation of repellency to its other). The finite excludes everything other, but the infinite HAS no "other." The essential trait of the infinite is its INCLUSIVENESS, its power to embrace all particulars within an organismic whole.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, utilitarianism, banausoi, society, stupidity, deserving, exclusion, judgement, appropriateness, equality, democracy, merchants, and the public

To the Greeks not just slaves had to be excluded from the democratic franchise and public debate but also merchants, bankers, all money-grubbing banausoi, because any society stupid enough to entrust its ultimate values to be determined by the caste of utilitarians deserves fully what it gets. It would be like entrusting our sports to couch potatoes and paraplegics. Such a foolish society would get what we have in fact got, a civilization too fucking stupid to realize how hard cultural, political, spiritual and philosophical cripples labor to cripple everyone else to become just like them.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Jane Roberts on seth, jane roberts, coherence, inclusion, and exclusion

SETH said (paraphrased):  The universe expands… as an idea expands; and as sentences are built upon words… and paragraphs upon sentences, and each retains its own logic and continuity and evidence within that framework, so do all portions of the universe appear to to you with that same cohesiveness,  A sentence is meaningful because of the organization of its letters, vowels, syllables.  It makes sense, however, not only because of the letters or vowels or syllables that are used within it, but because of all the letters, vowels, or syllables it excludes.  The same applies to your universe.  It has meaning, coherence and order not only because of those realities that are obvious to you but also because of those inner realities that are "unspoken" or hidden.

Jane Roberts

Source: The Individual and the Nature of Mass Events (A Seth Book), Pages: 230

Contributed by: HeyOK

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