ethics

A Quote by Jim Hightower on greed, profit, corporation, business ethics, and ethics

"The corporation cannot be ethical, its only responsibility is to make a profit."

Jim Hightower

Source: Thieves in High Places: They've Stolen Our Country--And It's Time to Take It Back, Pages: 6

Contributed by: Inukshuk

A Quote by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr on liberty, conciousness, freedom, politics, and ethics

What we need is a new consciousness concerning the idea of human liberty.

Lew Rockwell

Source: http://www.lewrockwell.com/rockwell/liberal-post-interview.html

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Walter Russell on business, morality, balance, nature, law, love, morals, equal, good, service, interchange, ethical, and ethics

In those early days there was a general opinion that a business man could not be honest and make money or be successful. “Business is business,” was the slogan, with the connotation that no matter how sharp your practice it was all right if you did it legally.
“That is the jungle philosophy of every man for himself,” commented Mr. Russell. “It can no longer be practiced in the business world for it works against natural law. The future of great business lies in man’s comprehension of the principle of Balance in Natural Law and his determination to work WITH it instead of against it.
“The underlying principle of Balance in Nature’s One Law is equality of interchange between the pairs of opposites in any transaction in Nature. That principle must eventually be observed by big business, and the go-getter salesman who selfishly thinks that the sale he makes is the only thing that counts is not giving equally for what he takes. Therefore, I say, that equal interchange of goods and service between buyer and seller is the keynote of tomorrow’s business world when the vision of the modern business man awakens him to the wisdom of writing that policy into his code of ethics.”

Walter Russell

Source: The Man Who Tapped the Secrets of the Universe

Contributed by: esaruoho

A Quote by Hippocrates on ethics, medicine, and harm

Primum non nocere. (First, do no harm.)

Hippocrates (c.460 - 400 BC)

Contributed by: Barry

A Quote by Frédéric Bastiat on society, justice, law, morality, and ethics

Legal plunder has two roots: One, as we have just seen, is in human selfishness; the other is in false philanthropy.

Frédéric Bastiat

Source: http://www.econlib.org/library/Bastiat/basEss2.html

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Frédéric Bastiat on society, justice, law, morality, and ethics

No society can exist if respect for the law does not to some extent prevail; but the surest way to have the laws respected is to make them respectable. When law and morality are in contradiction, the citizen finds himself in the cruel dilemma of either losing his moral sense or of losing respect for the law, two evils of which one is as great as the other, and between which it is difficult to choose.

Frédéric Bastiat

Source: http://www.econlib.org/library/Bastiat/basEss2.html

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ishmael b. Jose b. Halafta on conscience, lashes, moral, ethics, hebew, proverb, and torah

  One pang of conscience is worth more than many lashes.

Jose Halafta

Source: Talmud: Berakhot, 7a

Contributed by: Andi

A Quote by Davice on morals, ethics, and america

This is America. You can be who you want to be, not who you should be.

Davice

Contributed by: Andi

A Quote by Aldo Leopold on land, earth, ecology, and ethics

That land is a community is the basic concept of ecology, but that land is to be loved and respected is an extension of ethics.

Aldo Leopold

Source: Encarta

Contributed by: davids_goddess

A Quote by David Loy on ethics, buddhism, bodhisattvas, nondual, anatta, self, and no-self

When I discover that i am you - that I am the trace of your traces - the ethical problem of how to relate to you is transformed. Loss of self-preoccupation entails the ability to response to others without an ulterior motive that needs to gain something, material or symbolic, from that encounter. Of course, the danger of abuse remains, if my nondual experience is not deep enough to root out those dualistic tendencies that incline me to manipulate others. As long as there is sense of self, therefore, there will be a need to inculcate morality, just as infants need training wheels on their bicycles. In Buddhism, however, ethical principles approximate the way of relating to others that nondual experience reveals; as in Christianity, I should love neighbor as myself - in this case because the neighbor is myself. This makes ethical responsibility for Buddhism not the means to salvation but natural to the expression of genuine enlightenment. It is what might be called the "nonmoral morality" of the Bodhisattva, who, having nothing to gain or lost - because he or she has no self to do the gaining or losting - is devoted to the welfare of others. The Bodhisattva knows that no one is fully saved until everyone is save. When I am the universe, to help others is to help myself. To become enlightened is to forget one's own dukkha, only to wake up in - or rather at one with - a world of dukkha. The career of the Bodhisattva is helping others, not because one ought to, for traditionally the Bodhisattva is not bound by dogma or morality, because one is the situation and through oneself that situation draws forth a response to meet its needs.

David Loy

Source: The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory, Pages: 184..185

Contributed by: Ryan

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