elections

A Quote by Bruce Barton on business, company, day, elections, and leadership

An election goes on every minute of the business day across the counters of hundreds of thousands of stores and shops where the customers state their preferences and determine which company and which product shall be the leader today and which shall lead tomorrow.

Bruce Barton (1886 - 1967)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert ‘Bob' Dole on dogs, elections, and life

Describing life after the elections, 1997 Elizabeth's back at the red cross, and I'm walking the dog.

Bob Dole (1923 -)

Source: on the Today Show

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bill Vaughan on america, citizenship, democracy, and elections

A citizen of America will cross the ocean to fight for democracy, but won't cross the street to vote in a national election.

Bill Vaughan

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bill Stern on elections

Our elections are free - it's in the results where eventually we pay.

Bill Stern

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ann Richards on elections

July does not a November election make.

Ann Richards (1933 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on authority, elections, exercise, fraud, and sacred

RABBLE, n. In a republic, those who exercise a supreme authority tempered by fraudulent elections. The rabble is like the sacred Simurgh, of Arabian fable - omnipotent on condition that it do nothing.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on defeat, elections, and losing

LOSS, n. Privation of that which we had, or had not. Thus, in the latter sense, it is said of a defeated candidate that he "lost his election".

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, belief, cities, conversation, elections, freedom, god, injustice, prayer, presidency, privacy, slavery, speech, words, and work

I know there is a God, and that He hates injustice and slavery. I see the storm coming, and I know that His hand is in it. If he has a place and work for me - and I think He has - I believe I am ready. This comment was made in a private conversation with Newton Bateman, superintendent of public instruction for the state of Illinois, a few days before the election of 1860. During the election of 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy used the same words in a speech to the United Steelworkers of America convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, September 19, 1960. - Freedom of Communications, final report of the Committee on Commerce, United States Senate, part 1, p. 286 (1961). Senate Report. 87-994. As president, he used a variation of these words at the 10th annual presidential prayer breakfast, March 1, 1962. - Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F Kennedy, 1962, p. 176.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Attributed in. — Joseph Gilbert Holland, The Life of Abraham Lincoln,1886, Unverified.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on defeat, democracy, elections, laughter, newspapers, presidency, and speech

He said that he felt "like the boy that stumped his toe,-'it hurt too bad to laugh, and he was too big to cry.'" Attributed to Abraham Lincoln by John T. Morse, Jr., Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 149 (1893), referring to Lincoln's defeat by Senator Stephen Douglas in the 1858 senatorial campaign in Illinois. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, November 22, 1862, p. 131, attributed this reply to President Lincoln, when asked how he felt about the result of the New York election (where the Democratic candidate won the governorship]: "Somewhat like that boy in Kentucky, who stubbed his toe while running to see his sweetheart. The boy said he was too big to cry, and far too badly hurt to laugh." Adlai Stevenson told this story in his nationally-televised concession speech after the 1952 presidential election: "Someone asked me, as I came in, down on the street, how I felt, and I was reminded of a story that a fellow-townsman of ours used to tell-Abraham Lincoln. They asked him how he felt once after an unsuccessful election. He said that he was too old to cry, but it hurt too much to laugh."-The Papers of Adlai E. Stevenson, ed. Walter Johnson, vol. 4, p. 188 (1974). The speech was delivered at the Leland Hotel Springfield, Illinois, in the early hours of November 5, 1952.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

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