ego

A Quote by Susan Falter-Barns on failure and ego

There really is no such thing as failure.  There is only the rearrangement of plans and surrender of ego.

Susan Falter-Barns

Contributed by: Mary_C

A Quote by U.G. Krishnamurti on u g, krishnamurti, understanding, life, self, search, realization, enlightenment, freedom, ego, and meditation

The search ends with the realization that there is no such thing as enlightenment. By searching, you want to be free from the self, but whatever you are doing to free yourself from the self is the self. How can I make you understand this simple thing? There is no 'how'. If I tell you that, it will only add more momentum to that (search), strengthen that momentum. That is the question of all questions: "How, how, how?"

U.G. Krishnamurti

Source: The Mystique of Enlightenment

Contributed by: Nalini

A Quote by Earon on religion, life, hope, faith, inspiration, prejudice, fear, and ego

So you call yourself religious?  Please don't do that if you're stuck in only one of the many traditions that manifest divine love.  When you've found connection and inspiration from many religions, then you probably know more about divine love, and less about prejudice, ego and fear.

Earon Davis

Source: Earon S. Davis

Contributed by: Earon

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on fear, opening, submission, surrender, ego, and transcendence

Opening to our fear is an act of intimacy, a courageous welcoming of the disfigured and outcast into the living room of our being. Opening thus is also an act of surrender. As such, it is not a dissolution - or collapsing - or personal boundaries, as in submission, but rather an expanding of them.

In submission, we deaden ourselves, sinking into the shallows; in surrender, we enliven ourselves, dying into a deeper Life. In surrender we may lose face, but we do not lose touch. Submission flattens the ego; surrender transcends it. Submission is passive, but surrender is dynamic. - Robert Augustus Masters, Darkness Shining Wild, p. 30-31

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Darkness Shining Wild: An Odyssey to the Heart of Hell & Beyond: Meditations on Sanity, Suffering, Spirituality, and Liberation, Pages: 58

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on ego and spirituality

“Ego” as a concept has negative connotations for many spiritual seekers, for whom it is simply an impediment, an obstacle in need of eradication…Ego could be said to be a cult of one (or a self-enclosed coalition of survival-oriented habits that automatically refers to itself as “I”). This does not mean that this is evil or in need of annihilation, but rather that it's centered and unquestioningly governed by its own ideology…What is needed is not the elimination, but rather the illumination, of ego. DSW, p41

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Darkness Shining Wild: An Odyssey to the Heart of Hell & Beyond: Meditations on Sanity, Suffering, Spirituality, and Liberation, Pages: 58

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on fear, opening, submission, surrender, ego, and transcendence

Opening to our fear is an act of intimacy, a courageous welcoming of the disfigured and outcast into the living room of our being. Opening thus is also an act of surrender. As such, it is not a dissolution - or collapsing - or personal boundaries, as in submission, but rather an expanding of them.

In submission, we deaden ourselves, sinking into the shallows; in surrender, we enliven ourselves, dying into a deeper Life. In surrender we may lose face, but we do not lose touch. Submission flattens the ego; surrender transcends it. Submission is passive, but surrender is dynamic.

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Darkness Shining Wild: An Odyssey to the Heart of Hell & Beyond: Meditations on Sanity, Suffering, Spirituality, and Liberation, Pages: 30-31

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on ego, mortality, self-transcendence, and awakening

The sense of being somebody special (a legend in our own mind!) helps immunize “I” against the bare facticity of its own mortality, here-and-now instability, and innate insubstantialness.

Even when “I” dreams of transcending itself - as in those programs that have (or advertise) as their central agenda the eradication of ego - it is still an “I” who has now achieved the incomparable goal of self-transcendence! “Look, Ma, no ego!” we announce as we unicycle past our rapt inner audience, too proud to notice our pride, forgetting that self-conceit persists well into advanced transpersonal stages of development.

In our craving to be somebody special - and don't forget that we may find our specialness through being “nobody” - we bypass exploration of that very craving, committing far more of our passion to fulfilling our dreams than to actually awakening from them.

-Robert Augustus Masters, Darkness Shining Wild, p.58

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Darkness Shining Wild: An Odyssey to the Heart of Hell & Beyond: Meditations on Sanity, Suffering, Spirituality, and Liberation, Pages: 58

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Michael Singer on michael singer, the untethered soul, protection, ego, and contraction

When you close down and protect yourself, you are pulling a shell around the part of you that is weak.

Michael Singer

Source: The Untethered Soul, Pages: 60

Contributed by: David

A Quote by John Snelling on not self, ego, and attachment

Central to the Buddha's teaching is the doctrine of anatman: "not-self." This does not deny that the notion of an "I" works in the everyday world. In fact, we need a solid, stable ego to function in society. However, "I" is not real in an ultimate sense. It is a "name": a fictional construct that bears no correspondence to what is really the case. Because of this disjunction all kinds of problems ensue. Once our minds have constructed the notion of "I," it becomes our central reference point. We attach to it and identify with it totally. We attempt to advance what appears to be its interests, to defend it against real or apparent threats and menaces. And we look for ego-affirmation at every turn: confirmation that we exist and are valued. The Gordian Knot of preoccupations arising from all this absorbs us exclusively, at times to the point of obsession. This is, however, a narrow and constricted way of being. Though we cannot see it when caught in the convolutions of ego, there is something in us that is larger and deeper: a wholly other way of being.

John Snelling

Source: Elements of Buddhism

Contributed by: David

A Quote by John Snelling on ego, suffering, duality, non duality, delusion, mind, i, and self

A primary cause of suffering is delusion: our inability, because of a subtly willful blindness, to see things the way they truly are but instead in a distorted way. The world is in fact a seamless and dynamic unity: a single living organism that is constantly undergoing change. our minds, however, chop it up into separate, static bits and pieces, which we then try mentally and physically to manipulate. One of the mind's most dear creations is the idea of the person and, closest to home, of a very special person which each one of us calls "I": a separate, enduring ego or self. In a moment, then, the seamless universe is cut in two. There is "I" -- and there is all the rest. That means conflict -- and pain, for "I" cannot control that fathomless vastness against which it is set. It will try, of course, as a flea might pit itself against an elephant, but it is a vain enterprise.

John Snelling

Contributed by: David

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