effort

A Quote by Takuan Soho on body, direction, discipline, effort, justice, and mind

When a person does not think, "Where shall I put it?" the mind will extend throughout the entire body and move to any place at all. . . . The effort not to stop the mind in just one place - this is discipline. Not stopping the mind is object and essence. Put it nowhere and it will be everywhere. Even in moving the mind outside the body, if it is sent in one direction, it will be lacking in nine others. If the mind is not restricted to just one direction, it will be in all ten.

Takuan Soho (1573 - ?)

Source: Takuan Soho in The Unfettered Mind. Trans. W. S. Wilson. Tokyo, 1986., p 62

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Susan Brownell Anthony on effort, prose, and understanding

I can see that "reap" and "deep," "prayers" and "bears," . . . do rhyme, and so I suppose it is a splendid effort, but if you had written it in plain prose, I could have understood it a great deal better and read it a great deal more easily.

Susan B. Anthony (1820 - 1906)

Source: Responding in 1987 to an admirer who had written a poem in her honor.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stuart Kauffman on accidents, argument, effort, facts, fame, growth, history, justice, needs, order, plants, reflection, and understanding

Pick up a pinecone and count the spiral rows of scales. You may find eight spirals winding up to the left and 13 spirals winding up to the right, or 13 left and 21 right spirals, or other pairs of numbers. The striking fact is that these pairs of numbers are adjacent numbers in the famous Fibonacci series: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21. . . . Here, each term is the sum of the previous two terms. The phenomenon is well known and called phyllotaxis. Many are the efforts of biologists to understand why pinecones, sunflowers, and many other plants exhibit this remarkable pattern. Organisms do the strangest things, but all these odd things need not reflect selection or historical accident. Some of the best efforts to understand phyllotaxis appeal to a form of self-organization. Paul Green, at Stanford, has argued persuasively that the Fibonacci series is just what one would expect as the simplest self-repeating pattern that can be generated by the particular growth processes in the growing tips of the tissues that form sunflowers, pinecones, and so forth. Like a snowflake and its sixfold symmetry, the pinecone and its phyllotaxis may be part of order for free . . .

Stuart Kauffman

Source: Stuart Kauffman in At Home in the Universe, Oxford University Press, 1995, p 151.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen L. Richards on advertising, authors, books, christianity, confidence, criticism, direction, effort, family, good, hunger, life, mind, optimism, peace, propaganda, religion, success, thinking, and time

Some time ago a member of my family sent to me a critical article written by Mr. Edmund Fuller in a publication called Saturday Review. The criticism of the writer is directed against the effort made to satisfy what the author designates as "general religious hunger," with books, articles, and public appearances of nationally advertised individuals, carrying on a propaganda for what is characterized as (these are quotes) "the good life," "peace of mind," "positive thinking," and "successful" or "confident living." What the author objects to most strenuously is not so much that propaganda should be issued for the optimism of "peace of mind" and "positive thinking," but that this psychological optimism should be held out in any form as an interpretation of or a substitute for the real Christian religion.

Stephen L. Richards (1879 - 1959)

Source: Ensign, November 1958, Pg.5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen Butler Leacock on effort, endings, fighting, growth, past, people, struggle, and victory

How can you shorten the subject? That stern struggle with the multiplication table, for many people not yet ended in victory, how can you make it less? Square root, as obdurate as a hardwood stump in a pasturenothing but years of effort can extract it. You can't hurry the process. Or pass from arithmetic to algebra; you can't shoulder your way past quadratic equations or ripple through the binomial theorem. Instead, the other way; your feet are impeded in the tangled growth, your pace slackens, you sink and fall somewhere near the binomial theorem with the calculus in sight on the horizon. So died, for each of us, still bravely fighting, our mathematical training; except for a set of people called "mathematicians" -- born so, like crooks.

Stephen Butler Leacock (1869 - 1944)

Source: H. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on effort, ideas, ignorance, justice, mind, philosophy, and understanding

One is not unpopular because he uses peculiar expressions; that just so happens; such terms become a fad, and by and by everybody, down to the last simpleton, uses them. But a person who follows through an idea in his mind is, and always will be, essentially unpopular. That is why Socrates was unpopular, though he did not use any special terms, for to grasp and hold his 'ignorance' requires greater vital effort than understanding the whole of Hegel's philosophy.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE JOURNALS

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sogyal Rinpoche on certainty, correction, doubt, effort, mind, nature, needs, questions, rest, and understanding

{While meditating} I sit quietly and rest in the nature of mind; I don't question or doubt whether I am in the "correct" state or not. There is no effort, only rich understanding, wakefulness, and unshakable certainty. When I am in the nature of mind, the ordinary mind is no longer there. There is no need to sustain or confirm a sense of being: I simply am.

Sogyal Rinpoche

Source: Sogyal Rinpoche in The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, HarperCollins Publishers, 1993, p. 63

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Roger Bannister on driving, effort, and pain

The man who can drive himself further once the effort gets painful is the man who will win.

Sir Roger Bannister (1929 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sidney Powell on effort, interest, service, and work

Try to forget yourself in the service of others. For when we think too much of ourselves and our own interests, we easily become despondent. But when we work for others, our efforts return to bless us.

Sidney Powell

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shapley R. Hunter on effort and lies

The continued utterance of a lie does not make it true, but it does convince many that it is, particularly if you can squelch most efforts to expose the lie.

Shapley R. Hunter

Source: 1992, via CompuServe

Contributed by: Zaady

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