education

A Quote by Carter G. Woodson on education, effort, and information

The mere imparting of information is not education. Above all things, the effort must result in making a man think and do for himself.

Carter G. Woodson

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Carl Ransom Rogers on change, education, and learning

The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn . . . and change.

Carl Rogers

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Carl Gustav Jung on education, good, hypocrisy, injustice, learning, love, men, neighbors, people, respect, tolerance, understanding, and violence

If people can be educated to see the lowly side of their own natures, it may be hoped that they will also learn to understand and to love their fellow men better. A little less hypocrisy and a little more tolerance towards oneself can only have good results in respect for our neighbor; for we are all too prone to transfer to our fellows the injustice and violence we inflict upon our own natures.

Carl Jung (1875 - 1961)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Brigham Young on appreciation, day, education, life, power, and work

Education is the power to think clearly, to act well in a day's work and . . . to appreciate life.

Brigham Young (1801 - 1877)

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A Quote by Bishop Lancelot Andrewes on citizenship, confession, education, faith, friendship, gifts, god, good, grace, honesty, hope, life, nature, parenthood, promises, religion, secrets, sermons, sincerity, teachers, and present

THANKSGIVING O my Lord, my Lord, I thank Thee for that I am, that I am alive, that I am rational: for nurture, preservation, governance: for education, citizenship, religion: for Thy gifts of grace, nature, estate: for redemption, regeneration, instruction: for calling, recalling, further calling manifold: for forbearance, longsuffering, long longsuffering towards me, many times, many years, until now: for all good offices I have received, good speed I have gotten: for any good thing done: for the use of things present, thy promise and my hope touching the fruition of the good things to come: for my parents honest and good, teachers gentle, benefactors always to be had in remembrance, colleagues likeminded, hearers attentive, friends sincere, retainers faithful: for all who have stood me in good stead by their writings, their sermons, conversations, prayers, examples, rebukes, wrongs: for these things and all other, which I wot of, which I wot not of, open and secret, things I remember, things I have forgotten withal, things done to me after my will or yet against my will, I confess to Thee and bless Thee and give thanks unto Thee, and I will confess and bless and give thanks to Thee all the days of my life. What thanks can I render to God again for all the benefits that He hath done unto me?

Bishop Lancelot Andrewes (1555 - 1626)

Source: Manuscript notebook of Private Prayers for personal use, which was published after his death.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bishop Creighton on education and questions

The real object of education is to have a man in the condition of continually asking questions.

Bishop Creighton

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Beverly LaHaye on children, curiosity, education, enemies, family, good, obsession, radicals, schools, and sex

One of the most devastating enemies of the family is radical sex education in the public school. It is more explicit than necessary for the good of the child. Too much sex education too soon causes undue curiosity and obsession with sex.

Beverly LaHaye

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on achievement, control, education, future, hope, inspiration, past, teaching, and wishes

It is because modern education is so seldom inspired by a great hope that it so seldom achieves great results. The wish to preserve the past rather than the hope of creating the future dominates the minds of those who control the teaching of the young.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on acceptance, change, common sense, democracy, education, ignorance, insincerity, language, life, mathematics, meaning, needs, philosophy, physics, understanding, and words

The doctrine, as I understand it, consists in maintaining that the language of daily life, with words used in their ordinary meanings, suffices for philosophy, which has no need of technical terms or of changes in the significance of common terms. I find myself totally unable to accept this view. I object to it: 1.Because it is insincere; 2.Because it is capable of excusing ignorance of mathematics, physics and neurology in those who have had only a classical education; 3.Because it is advanced by some in a tone of unctuous rectitude, as if opposition to it were a sin against democracy; 4.Because it makes philosophy trivial; 5.Because it makes almost inevitable the perpetuation amongst philosophers of the muddle-headedness they have taken over from common sense.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Portraits from Memory, Russell

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on awareness, education, facts, future, greatness, individuality, intelligence, knowledge, life, mind, organize, past, people, power, religion, present, time, value, and wishes

If I had the power to organize higher education as I should wish it to be, I should seek to substitute for the old orthodox religions - which appeal to few among the young, and those as a rule the least intelligent and the most obscurantist - something which is perhaps hardly to be called religion, since it is merely a focusing of attention upon well-ascertained facts. I should seek to make young people vividly aware of the past, vividly realizing that the future of man will in all likelihood be immeasurably longer than his past, profoundly conscious of the minuteness of the planet upon which we live and of the fact that life on this planet is only a temporary incident; and at the same time with these facts which tend to emphasize the insignificance of the individual, I should present quite another set of facts designed to impress upon the mind of the young the greatness of which the individual is capable, and the knowledge that throughout all the depths of stellar space nothing of equal value is known to us. . . .

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: The Conquest of Happiness

Contributed by: Zaady

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