economics

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on caring, choice, debt, economics, government, happiness, independence, labor, liberty, and people

To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must take our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we run into such debts, we must be taxed in our meat and drink, in our necessities and in our comforts, in our labors and in our amusements. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labor of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Terence Kealey on america, computers, country, decisions, economics, electricity, future, generations, government, growth, losing, money, myth, power, projects, research, science, service, success, war, wealth, and world

There is a central myth about British science and economic growth, and it goes like this: science breeds wealth, Britain is in economic decline, therefore Britain has not done enough science. Actually, it is easy to show that a key cause of Britain's economic decline has been that the government has funded too much science. . . . Post-war British science policy illustrates the folly of wasting money on research. The government decided, as it surveyed the ruins of war-torn Europe in 1945, that the future lay in computers, nuclear power and jet aircraft, so successive administrations poured money into these projects-to vast technical success. The world's first commercial mainframe computer was British, sold by Ferrranti in 1951; the world's first commercial jet aircraft was British, the Comet, in service in 1952; the first nuclear power station was British, Calder Hall, commissioned in 1956; and the world's first and only supersonic commercial jet aircraft was Anglo-French, Concorde, in service in 1976. Yet these technical advances crippled us economically, because they were so uncommercial. The nuclear generation of electricity, for example, had lost 2.1 billion pounds by 1975 (2.1 billion pounds was a lot then); Concord had lost us, alone, 2.3 billion pounds by 1976; the Comet crashed and America now dominates computers. Had these vast sums of money not been wasted on research, we would now be a significantly richer country.

Terence Kealey

Source: Terence Kealey Wasting Billions, the Scientific Way, The Sunday Times, Oct. 13, 1996.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sylvia Porter on economics and rules

One of the soundest rules to remember when making forecasts in the field of economics is that whatever is to happen is happening already.

Sylvia Porter

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A Quote by Sir William Temple on economics

Human status ought not to depend upon the changing demands of the economic process. The Malvern Manifesto: Drawn up by a Conference of the Province of York, January 10, 1941; signed for the Conference by Temple, then Archbishop of York (later Archbishop of Canterbury).

Sir William Temple (1881 - 1944)

Source: The Malvern Manifesto

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A Quote by Sir Anthony Eden on economics

Everyone is always in favor of general economy and particular expenditure.

Sir Anthony Eden (1897 - 1977)

Source: "Sayings of the Week," in The Observer, 17 June 1956.

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A Quote by Sinclair Lewis on advertising and economics

Advertising is a valuable economic factor because it is the cheapest way of selling goods, especially if the goods are worthless.

Sinclair Lewis (1885 - 1951)

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A Quote by Simone Weil on citizenship, conflict, country, economics, interest, and war

What a country calls its vital economic interests are not the things which enable its citizens to live, but the things which enable it to make war. Petrol is much more likely than wheat to be a cause of international conflict.

Simone Weil (1909 - 1943)

Source: The Need for Roots (1949)

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A Quote by Sam Keen on change, destruction, earth, economics, habits, ideas, inventions, love, men, soul, success, vices, virtue, wonder, and work

The Greeks invented the idea of nemesis to show how any single virtue, stubbornly maintained gradually changes into a destructive vice. Our success, our industry, our habit of work have produced our economic nemesis. Work made modern men great, but now threatens to usurp our souls, to inundate the earth in things and trash, to destroy our capacity to love and wonder.

Sam Keen

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A Quote by Rush H. Limbaugh III on america, economics, growth, history, improvement, income, sharing, success, and taxes

Regarding the Economy & Taxation: America's most successful achievers do pay a higher share of the total tax burden. The top one percent income earners paid 18 percent of the total tax burden in 1981, and paid 25 percent in 1991. The bottom 50 percent of income earners paid only 8 percent of the total tax burden, and paid only 5 percent in 1991. History shows that tax cuts have always resulted in improved economic growth producing more tax revenue in the treasury.

Rush Limbaugh (1951 -)

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A Quote by Rush H. Limbaugh III on america, clarity, country, economics, experience, growth, history, improvement, income, jobs, restaurants, sharing, success, and taxes

Regarding the Economy & Taxation: The record of economic success during the 1980's is clear: 18.6 million new jobs were created, increasing U.S. civilian employment by 20 percent. Only 12 percent of these jobs were in low-paid restaurant and retail areas, while 82 percent were in high-paid technical, managerial and professional areas. Once Reagan's tax cuts kicked in (fiscal year 1982), the country experienced 92 months of economic growth without a recession. This represented the longest period of sustained peacetime economic growth in American history. America's most successful achievers do pay a higher share of the total tax burden. The top one percent income earners paid 18 percent of the total tax burden in 1981, and paid 25 percent in 1991. The bottom 50 percent of income earners paid only 8 percent of the total tax burden, and paid only 5 percent in 1991. History shows that tax cuts have always resulted in improved economic growth producing more tax revenue in the treasury.

Rush Limbaugh (1951 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

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