eating

A Quote by John Pierrakos on life, movement, breathing, eating, and walking

Life is movement—we breathe, we eat, we walk—we move!

John Pierrakos

Source: Eros, Love & Sexuality : The Forces That Unify Man & Woman, Pages: 13

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Sherman Alexie on vegetarianism, stewardship, and eating

I'll quit eating meat when you get a cow out here to beat me at a poetry slam. Only so many words rhyme with 'Mooo.' I mean, yes, we're supposed to be better stewards; yes, we're supposed to take care of the earth; yes, we're supposed to honor the sacrifices made by the animals; yes yes yes yes yes, but dammit, we're in charge, and you know why? It's because of these [holding out thumbs]...
Maybe you think that carrots are less important than cows. I think they're equal, especially in a sauce.

Sherman Alexie

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Sherman Alexie on vegetarianism, veganism, eating, food choices, choice, and necessity

How self-centered, how arrogant...  Imagine the awesome privilege of living in a society where you get to choose what you eat at each and every meal.  When I was a kid, I was a vegetarian and a vegan for long stretches… I was a commodity cheese-atarian.

Sherman Alexie

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Anne Morrow Lindbergh on simple pleasures, husbands, wives, spouses, eating, breakfast, simplicity, and communion

A simple enough pleasure, surely, to have breakfast alone with one's husband, but how seldom married people in the midst of life achieve it.

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Source: Gift from the Sea: 50th Anniversary Edition

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Edward Paul Abbey on diet, eating, raw food, raw, veganism, vegetarianism, spirituality, and obsession

Nobody seems more obsessed by diet than our anti-materialist, otherworldly, New Age, spiritual types.  But if the material world is merely illusion, an honest guru should be as content with Budweiser and bratwurst as with raw carrot juice, tofu, and seaweed slime.

Edward Abbey (1927 - 1989)

Source: A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (Vox Clamantis in Deserto): Notes from a Secret Journal, Pages: 17

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Tibetan Proverb on tibetan, attire, clothing, nourishment, eating, and clothing

Attire yourself to be acceptable in another man's world, nourish yourself to be acceptable in your own.

Tibetan Proverb

Contributed by: Nikki

A Quote by Wendell Berry on food, eating, pleasure, ignorance, connection, world, experience, gratitude, mystery, and power

Eating with the fullest pleasure - pleasure, that is, that does not depend on ignorance - is perhaps the profoundest enactment of our connection with the world. In this pleasure we experience and celebrate our dependence and our gratitude, for we are living from mystery, from creatures we did not make and powers we cannot comprehend.

Wendell Berry (1934 -)

Source: Vintage Wendell Berry: On the Pleasures of Eating

Contributed by: Megan

A Quote by Wendell Berry on eating, mystery, gratitude, and pleasure

Eating with the fullest pleasure –pleasure, that is, that does not depend on ignorance –is perhaps the profoundest enactment of our connection with the world.  In this pleasure we experience and celebrate our dependence and gratitude, for we are living from mystery, from creatures we did not make and powers we cannot comprehend.

Wendell Berry (1934 -)

Contributed by: _

A Quote by Michael Pollan on eating, agriculture, food, and food supply

Another theme, or premise really, is that the way we eat represents our most profound engagement with the natural world. Daily, our eating turns nature into culture, transforming the body of the world into our bodies and minds. Agriculture has done more to reshape the natural world than anything else we humans do, both its landscapes and the composition of its flora and fauna. Our eating also constitutes a relationship with dozens of other species—plants, animals, and fungi— with which we have coevolved to the point where our fates are deeply entwined. Many of these species have evolved expressly to gratify our desires, in the intricate dance of domestication that has allowed us and them to prosper together as we could never have prospered apart.  But our relationships with the wild species we eat—from the mushrooms we pick in the forest to the yeasts that leaven our bread—are no less compelling, and far more mysterious. Eating puts us in touch with all that we share with the other animals, and all that sets us apart. It defines us.

What is perhaps most troubling, and sad, about industrial eating is how thoroughly it obscures all these relationships and connections.  To go from the chicken (Gallus gallus) to the Chicken McNugget is to leave this world in a journey of forgetting that could hardly be more costly, not only in terms of the animal’s pain but in our pleasure, too. But forgetting, or not knowing in the first place, is what the industrial food chain is all about, the principal reason it is so opaque, for if we could see what lies on the far side of the increasingly high walls of our industrial agriculture, we would surely change the way we eat.

“Eating is an agricultural act,” as Wendell Berry famously said. It is also an ecological act, and a political act, too. Though much has been done to obscure this simple fact, how and what we eat determines to a great extent the use we make of the world—and what is to become of it.  To eat with a fuller consciousness of all that is at stake might sound

like a burden, but in practice few things in life afford quite as much satisfaction. By comparison, the pleasures of eating industrially, which is to say eating in ignorance, are fleeting. Many people today seem perfectly content eating at the end of an industrial food chain, without a thought in the world: this book is probably not for them; there are things in it that will ruin their appetite. But in the end this is a book about the pleasures of eating, the kind of pleasures that are only deepened by knowing.

Michael Pollan

Source: The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (Large Print Press), Pages: 10

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Michael Pollan on cooking, eating, and destruction

The repetitive phases of cooking leave plenty of mental space for reflection, and as I chopped and minced and sliced I thought about the rhythms of cooking, one of which involves destroying the order of the things we bring from nature into our kitchens, only to then create from them a new order.  We butcher, grind, chop, grate, mince, and liquefy raw ingredients, breaking down formerly living things so that we might recombine them in new, more cultivated forms.  When you think about it, this is the same rhythm, once removed, that governs all eating in nature, which invariably entails the destruction of certain living things, by chewing and then digestion, in order to sustain other living things.  In The Hungry Soul Leon Kass calls this the great paradox of eating:  “that to preserve their life and form living things necessarily destroy life and form.”  If there is any shame in that destruction, only we humans seem to feel it, and then only on occasion.  But cooking doesn’t only distance us from our destructiveness, turning the pile of blood and guts into savory salami, it also symbolically redeems it, making good our karmic debts: Look what good, what beauty, can come of this!  Putting a great dish on the table is our way of celebrating the wonders of form we humans can create from this matter – this quantity of sacrificed life – just before the body takes its first destructive bite.

Michael Pollan

Source: The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (Large Print Press), Pages: 405

Contributed by: HeyOK

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