dzogchen

A Quote by John Makransky on religion, love, self-help, spiritual growth, buddhism, and dzogchen

Whatever the strategies for a successful life promulgated in self-help books, and no matter how hard someone may thump a holy book to declare a particular belief as the answer to all life's problems, none of these approaches works if the basic motive of genuine love, of actual care for persons, is not present.

John Makransky

Source: Awakening Through Love: Unveiling Your Deepest Goodness, Pages: 8

Contributed by: BlueHwyFlaneur

A Quote by John Makransky on love, compassion, altruism, buddhism, and dzogchen

We ache at the violence, pain, and hunger in our world, and inside us is a will to help. But 'help' only helps if it is an active expression of love. Otherwise our attempts to help, limited by narrow self-concern, become rigid and too easily discouraged.

John Makransky

Source: Awakening Through Love: Unveiling Your Deepest Goodness, Pages: 4

Contributed by: BlueHwyFlaneur

A Quote by John Makransky on love, compassion, altruism, social service, burnout, buddhism, and dzogchen

If our motivation for serving others is tied to a strong desire for specific outcomes or for praise, our potential is limited. Because we can never completely control the results of our efforts, we may become easily frustrated and disheartened.

John Makransky

Source: Awakening Through Love: Unveiling Your Deepest Goodness, Pages: 6

Contributed by: BlueHwyFlaneur

A Quote by John Makransky on love, compassion, altruism, society, fear, violence, buddhism, and dzogchen

When individuals and groups do not experience being loved -- when whole communities lose hope that anyone cares -- fear and violence are often seized upon as seeming protectors in the form of gangs, mobs, and communal hostility.

John Makransky

Source: Awakening Through Love: Unveiling Your Deepest Goodness, Pages: 9

Contributed by: BlueHwyFlaneur

A Quote by Tsoknyi Rinpoche on buddhism, rigpa, dzogchen, nondualism, and clinging

What is the difference between the real state of rigpa and the imitation?
Check whether or not there is any clinging, any sense of keeping hold of something. With conceptual rigpa you notice a sense of trying to keep a state, trying to maintain a state, trying to nurture a state. There is a sense of hope or fear and also a sense of being occupied. Understand? The keeping means there’s a sense of protecting, of not wanting to lose it, in the back of the mind. This is not bad, it’s good, and for some people there’s no way around training like that in the beginning. Through training in this way, that conceptual aspect becomes increasingly refined and clarified.

So you practice more, more, more. Now you have more of a sense of openness, but still you’re holding this openness. All right, then, let the openness go. Let’s say that after two months you let it go. But still you’re staying within the openness—so then you practice letting go of the staying. And somehow there is still a remnant of wanting to achieve it again. So you let that go as well, and slowly again let it go, let it go, until you become very much “just there,” and finally very free and easy.

Tsoknyi Rinpoche

Source: http://www.pundarika.org/journey/Tcollection.html

Contributed by: Ryan

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