duty

A Quote by William Thomas Manning, D.D. on duty, faith, god, humanity, power, religion, and service

Here in our land, and in other lands, many have been drifting toward a religion which says much about rights but little about duties; a religion which thinks only about humanity and little about God; which lays great stress on service but little stress on faith; which puts all the emphasis on man and his power and very little on God and His power.

William Thomas Manning (1866 - 1949)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art, duty, fashion, good, promotion, service, and world

O good old man, how well in thee appears The constant service of the antique world, When service sweat for duty, not for meed! Thou art not for the fashion of these times, Where none will sweat but for promotion, And having that do choke their service up Even with the having. . . .

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, act 2, scene 3

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A Quote by William Shakespeare on blessings, charity, death, duty, god, good, grace, love, mind, motherhood, and obedience

DUCHESS OF YORK: God bless thee, and put meekness in thy mind, Love, charity, obedience, and true duty! GLOUCESTER: [Aside ] Amen and make me die a good old man! That is the butt-end of a mother's blessing: I marvel why her grace did leave it out.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard III, Act 1I, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, death, duty, earth, fatherhood, faults, grief, heart, heaven, impatience, losing, love, mind, nature, nobility, obligation, reason, simplicity, sons, sorrow, understanding, vulgarity, and world

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet, To give these mourning duties to your father: But, you must know, your father lost a father; That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound In filial obligation for some term To do obsequious sorrow: but to persever In obstinate condolement is a course Of impious stubbornness; 'tis unmanly grief; It shows a will most incorrect to heaven, A heart unfortified, a mind impatient, An understanding simple and unschool'd: For what we know must be and is as common As any the most vulgar thing to sense, Why should we in our peevish opposition Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature, To reason most absurd: whose common theme Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried, From the first corse till he that died to-day, 'This must be so.' We pray you, throw to earth This unprevailing woe, and think of us As of a father: for let the world take note, You are the most immediate to our throne; And with no less nobility of love Than that which dearest father bears his son, Do I impart toward you.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Rounseville Alger on desires, duty, and life

The line of life is a ragged diagonal between duty and desire.

William Rounseville Alger (1822 - 1905)

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A Quote by William James on duty, family, genius, mind, and power

A genius is the man in whom you are least likely to find the power of attending to anything insipid or distasteful in itself. He breaks his engagements, leaves his letters unanswered, neglects his family duties incorrigibly, because he is powerless to turn his attention down and back from those more interesting trains of imagery with which his genius constantly occupies his mind.

William James (1842 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Graham Sumner on art, books, discovery, duty, force, glory, inventions, life, mankind, men, order, rest, service, talent, and welfare

In the New Testament it is taught that willing and voluntary service to others is the highest duty and glory in human life. . . . The men of talent are constantly forced to serve the rest. They make the discoveries and inventions, order the battles, write the books, and produce the works of art. The benefit and enjoyment go to the whole. There are those who joyfully order their own lives so that they may serve the welfare of mankind.

William Graham Sumner (1840 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William G. Simms on duty, exercise, sacrifice, success, and virtue

To be amiable is most certainly a duty but it is not to be exercised at the expense of any virtue. He who seeks to always do the amiable thing can at times be successful only by the sacrifice of his manhood.

William G. Simms (1806 - 1870)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William G. Simms on awards, criticism, discrimination, duty, and praise

Neither praise nor blame is the object of true criticism. Justly to discriminate, firmly to establish, wisely to prescribe and honestly to award - these are the true aims and duties of criticism.

William G. Simms (1806 - 1870)

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A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, courage, duty, glory, heart, honor, hope, needs, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, and writers

The poet's, the writer's, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of the past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man; it can be one of the props, the pillars, to help him endure and prevail. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the original draft of speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

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