dreams

A Quote by Anaïs Nin on country, dreams, friendship, life, love, and space

Throw your dreams into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back, a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country.

Anaïs Nin (1903 - 1977)

Source: The Diaries of Anaïs Nin

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Amy Lowell on beauty, belief, dreams, existence, heart, heaven, rudeness, songs, vision, and world

I ask but one thing of you, only one, That always you will be my dream of you; That never shall I wake to find untrue All this I have believed and rested on, Forever vanished, like a vision gone Out into the night. Alas, how few There are who strike in us a chord we knew Existed, but so seldom heard its tone We tremble at the half-forgotten sound. The world is full of rude awakenings And heaven-born castles shattered to the ground, Yet still our human longing vainly clings To a belief in beauty through all wrongs. O stay your hand, and leave my heart its songs!

Amy Lowell (1874 - 1925)

Source: To a Friend

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Amos Bronson Alcott on dreams and senses

Our dreams drench us in senses, and senses steps us again in dreams.

Amos Bronson Alcott (1799 - 1888)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on dreams, sleep, and soldiers

REVEILLE, n. A signal to sleeping soldiers to dream of battlefields no more, but get up and have their blue noses counted.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on dreams, philosophy, and reality

REALITY, n. The dream of a mad philosopher. That which would remain in the cupel if one should assay a phantom. The nucleus of a vacuum.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on acquaintance, dreams, eternity, future, knowledge, and past

PAST, n. That part of Eternity with some small fraction of which we have a slight and regrettable acquaintance. [T]he Past is the Future of yesterday, the Future is the Past of to-morrow. They are one - the knowledge and the dream.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on death, dreams, and existence

EXISTENCE, n. A transient, horrible, fantastic dream,/ Wherein is nothing yet all things do seem:/ From which we're wakened by a friendly nudge/ Of our bedfellow Death, and cry: "O fudge!"

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Algernon Charles Swinburne on dreams and nations

Not with dreams, but with blood and with iron, Shall a nation be moulded at last.

Algernon Swinburne (1837 - 1909)

Source: A Word for the Country.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Algernon Charles Swinburne on dreams

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Forget that I remember And dream that I forget.

Algernon Swinburne (1837 - 1909)

Source: Rococo.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Noyes on christmas, day, death, dreams, glory, gold, home, mountains, and songs

The Three Ships As I went up the mountain-side The sea below me glitter'd wide, And, Eastward, far away, I spied On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day, The three great ships that take the tide On Christmas Day in the morning. Ye have heard the song, how these must ply From the harbours of home to the ports o' the skyl Do ye dream none knoweth the whither and why On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day The three great ships go sailing by On Christmas Day in the morning? Yet, as I live, I never knew That ever a song could ring so true, Till I saw them break thro' a haze of blue On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And the marvellous ancient flags they flew On Christmas Day in the morning! From the heights above the belfried town I saw that the sails were patched and brown, But the 9ags were a-fiame with a great renown On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day, And on every mast was a golden crown On Christmas Day in the morning. Most marvellous ancient ships were these! Were their prows a-plunge to the Chersonese, For the pomp of Rome, or the glory of Greece, On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day? Were they out on a quest for the Golden Fleece On Christmas Day in the morning? The sun and the wind they told me there How goodly a load the three ships bear, For the first is gold and the second is myrrh On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And the third is frankincense most rare, On Christmas Day in the morning. They have mixed their shrouds with the golden sky, They have faded away where the last dreams die . . . Ah yet, will ye watch, when the mist lifts high On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day? Will ye see three ships come sailing by On Christmas Day in the morning?

Alfred Noyes (1880 - 1958)

Contributed by: Zaady

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