dream

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on writing, childhood, and dream

In order to dream so far, is it enough to read? Isn't it necessary to write? Write as in our schoolboy past, in those days when, as Bonnoure says, the letters wrote themselves one by one, either in their gibbosity or else in their pretentious elegance? In those days, spelling was a drama, our drama of culture at work in the interior of a word.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 50

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on observe, dream, reverie, poet, and peace

It is quite evident that a barrier must be cleared in order to escape the psychologists and enter into a realm which is not "auto-observant", where we ourselves no longer divide ourselves into observer and observed. Then the dreamer is completely dissolved in his reverie. His reverie is his silent life. It is that silent peace which the poet wants to convey to us.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 45

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on night, dream, nightmare, and being

The night dreamer cannot articulate a cogito. The night dream is a dream without a dreamer.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 22

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reverie, dream, poet, and poetry

In living off all the reflecting light furnished by poets, the I which dreams the reverie reveals itself not as poet but as poetizing I.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 22

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on dream, words, reading, page, meaning, and youth

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the word begin to move around. Stressed accents begin to invert. The word abandons its meaning like an overload which is too heavy and prevents dreaming. Then words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 17

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reverie, word, dream, writing, pen, and page

Doesn't reverie ramify the sentence which has been begun? A word is a bud attempting to become a twig. How can one not dream while writing? It is the pen which dreams. The blank page gives the right to dream. If only one could write for himself alone.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 17

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on memory, childhood, image, dream, and reverie

If there is any realm where distinction is especially difficult, it is the realm of childhood memories, the realm of beloved images harbored in memory since childhood. These memories which live by the image and in virtue of the image become, at certain times of our lives and particularly during the quiet age, the origin and matter of a complex reverie: the memory dreams, and reverie remembers.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 20

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on dream and reverie

Instead of looking for the dream in reverie, people should look for reverie in the dream. There are calm beaches in the midst of nightmares.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 12

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on universe, reverie, dream, happiness, destiny, gift, and work

A universe comes to contribute to our happiness when reverie comes to accentuate our repose. You must tell the man who wants to dream well to begin by being happy. Then reverie plays out its veritable destiny; it becomes poetic reverie and by it, in it, everything becomes beautiful. If the dreamer had "the gift" he would turn his reverie into a work. And this work would be grandiose since the dreamed world is automatically grandiose.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 12..13

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on solitude, dream, and memory

A pretext--not a cause--is sufficient for us to enter the "solitary situation", the situation of the dreaming solitude. In this solitude, memories arrange themselves in tableaux. Decor takes precedence over drama. Sad memories take on at least the peace of melancholy.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 14

Contributed by: Chris

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