doubt

A Quote by Wilson Mizner on doubt, education, faith, and respect

I respect faith, but doubt is what gets you an education.

Wilson Mizner (1876 - 1933)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on children, curiosity, doubt, faith, heart, peace, power, silence, soul, and universe

I have seen A curious child, who dwelt upon a tract Of inland ground, applying to his ear The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell; To which, in silence hushed, his very soul listened intensely; for from within were heard Murmurings whereby the monitor expressed Mysterious union with its native sea. Even such a shell the universe itself Is to the ear of faith; and there are times, I doubt not, when to you it doth impart Authentic tidings of invisible things, Of ebb and flow, and ever enduring power, And central peace, subsisting at the heart Of endless Agitation.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Makepeace Thackeray on doubt and women

When I say that I know women, I mean I know that I don't know them. Every single woman I ever knew is a puzzle to me, as, I have no doubt, she is to herself.

William Thackeray (1811 - 1863)

Source: Mr. Brown’s Letters

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Makepeace Thackeray on doubt and virtue

The wicked are wicked, no doubt, and they go astray and they fall, and they come by their deserts; but who can tell the mischief which the very virtuous do?

William Thackeray (1811 - 1863)

Source: The Newcomes. Book i. Chap. xx.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, deed, doubt, friendship, good, honor, love, men, power, privacy, reason, speech, wit, words, and worth

Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him: For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on doubt and modesty

Modest doubt is call'd The beacon of the wise.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Troilus and Cressida, Act 2, Scene 2

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A Quote by William Shakespeare on doubt

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O' thinkest thou we shall ever meet again? I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serve For sweet discourses in our times to come.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Romeo and Juliet, Act 3, Scene 5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, day, deed, doubt, envy, friendship, good, heart, honor, ingratitude, judgment, kindness, love, men, nobility, overcoming, perception, pity, power, preparation, privacy, reason, soul, speech, tears, time,

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through: See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no; For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's Statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Cæsar fell, O! what a fall was there, my countrymen; Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors. . . . . Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend. . . . . For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action , nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on change, doubt, jealousy, and life

Think'st thou I'd make a life of jealousy, To follow still the changes of the moon With fresh suspicions? No; to be once in doubt Is once to be resolved.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Othello

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on doubt and good

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Our doubts are traitors, And make us lose the good we oft might win, By fearing to attempt.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Measure for Measure

Contributed by: Zaady

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