discovery

A Quote by Sir Humphrey Davy on discovery

The most important of my discoveries have been suggested to me by my failures.

Humphrey Davy (1778 - 1829)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Francis Kennedy on action, beginning, belief, discovery, earth, ignorance, injustice, men, misery, protestantism, thought, violence, women, work, and world

Some believe there is nothing one man or one woman can do against the enormous array of the world's ills -- against misery, against ignorance, or injustice and violence. Yet many of the world's great movements, of thought and action, have flowed from the work of a single man. A young monk began the Protestant reformation, a young general extended an empire from Macedonia to the borders of the earth, and a young woman reclaimed the territory of France. It was a young Italian explorer who discovered the New World, and 32 year old Thomas Jefferson who proclaimed that all men are created equal. 'Give me a place to stand,' said Archimedes, 'and I will move the world.' These men moved the world, and so can we all.

Robert F. Kennedy (1925 - 1968)

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A Quote by Martin Luther King, Jr. on challenge and discovery

The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort but where he stands at times of challenge and discovery.

Martin Luther King Jr (1929 - 1968)

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A Quote by André Gide on discovery and risk

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

Andre Gide (1869 - 1951)

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A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on discovery and sex

An intellectual is a person who has discovered something more interesting than sex.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

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A Quote by Woody Allen on discovery, mathematics, students, and writing

Standard mathematics has recently been rendered obsolete by the discovery that for years we have been writing the numeral five backward. This has led to reevaluation of counting as a method of getting from one to ten. Students are taught advanced concepts of Boolean algebra, and formerly unsolvable equations are dealt with by threats of reprisals.

Woody Allen (1935 -)

Source: Howard Eves' Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber, and Schmidt, 1988.

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on discovery, freedom, honor, justice, manners, passion, principles, science, and sharing

Our inheritance of well-founded, slowly conceived codes of honor, morals and manners, the passionate convictions which so many hundreds of millions share together of the principles of freedom and justice, are far more precious to us than anything which scientific discoveries could bestow.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on argument, certainty, conviction, day, discovery, doubt, education, existence, facts, friendship, hell, independence, machines, mathematics, military, persistence, play, purity, purpose, reality, reason,

Some of my cousins who had the great advantage of University education used to tease me with arguments to prove that nothing has any existence except what we think of it. . . . These amusing mental acrobatics are all right to play with. They are perfectly harmless and perfectly useless. . . . I always rested on the following argument. . . We look up to the sky and see the sun. Our eyes are dazzled and our senses record the fact. So here is this great sun standing apparently on no better foundation than our physical senses. But happily there is a method, apart altogether from our physical senses, of testing the reality of the sun. It is by mathematics. By means of prolonged processes of mathematics, entirely separate from the senses, astronomers are able to calculate when an eclipse will occur. They predict by pure reason that a black spot will pass across the sun on a certain day. You go and look, and your sense of sight immediately tells you that their calculations are vindicated. So here you have the evidence of the senses reinforced by the entirely separate evidence of a vast independent process of mathematical reasoning. We have taken what is called in military map-making "a cross bearing." . . . When my metaphysical friends tell me that the data on which the astronomers made their calculations, were necessarily obtained originally through the evidence of the senses, I say, "no." They might, in theory at any rate, be obtained by automatic calculating-machines set in motion by the light falling upon them without admixture of the human senses at any stage. When it is persisted that we should have to be told about the calculations and use our ears for that purpose, I reply that the mathematical process has a reality and virtue in itself, and that once discovered it constitutes a new and independent factor. I am also at this point accustomed to reaffirm with emphasis my conviction that the sun is real, and also that it is hot - in fact hot as Hell, and that if the metaphysicians doubt it they should go there and see.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Winston S. Churchill, My Early Life, Fontana, London, 1972, pp 123-124.

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A Quote by William S. Ogdon on art, birds, character, clarity, conscience, contentment, control, determination, discovery, economics, effort, enemies, ethics, fashion, goodness, government, happiness, heart, individuality, life, listening, luxury, money,

The Art of Happiness There was never a time when so much official effort was being expended to produce happiness, and probably never a time when so little attention was paid by the individual to creating and personal qualities that make for it. What one misses most today is the evidence of widespread personal determination to develop a character that will, in itself, given any reasonable odds, make for happiness. Our whole emphasis is on the reform of living conditions, of increased wages, of controls on the economic structure-the government approach-and so little on man improving himself. The ingredients of happiness are so simple that they can be counted on one hand. Happiness comes from within, and rests most securely on simple goodness and clear conscience. Religion may not be essential to it, but no one ins known to have gained it without a philosophy resting on ethical principles. Selfishness is its enemy; to make another happy is to be happy one's self. It is quiet, seldom found for long in crowds, most easily won in moments of solitude and reflection. It cannot be bought; indeed, money has very little to do with it. No one is happy unless he is reasonably well satisfied with himself, so that the quest for tranquility must of necessity begin with self-examination. We shall not often be content with what we discover in this scrutiny. There is much to do, and so little done. Upon this searching self-analysis, however, depends the discovery of those qualities that make each man unique, and whose development alone can bring satisfaction. Of all those who have tried, down the ages, to outline a program for happiness, few have succeeded so well as William Henry Channing, chaplain of the House of Representatives in the middle of the last century: "To live content with small means; so seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy . . . to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to the stars and birds, to babes and sages, with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasions, hurry never; in a word to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common." It will be noted that no government can do this for you; you must do it for yourself.

William S. Ogdon

Source: New York Times, Editorial Page, Dec. 30, 1945

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A Quote by William Hazlitt on affection, boldness, darkness, discovery, genius, habits, meaning, mind, mystery, nature, originality, power, spirit, truth, and world

He is a man of capacity who possesses considerable intellectual riches: while he is a man of genius who finds out a vein of new ore. Originality is the seeing nature differently from others, and yet as it is in itself. It is not singularity or affectation, but the discovery of new and valuable truth. All the world do not see the whole meaning of any object they have been looking at. Habit blinds them to some things: shortsightedness to others. Every mind is not a gauge and measure of truth. Nature has her surface and her dark recesses. She is deep, obscure, and infinite. It is only minds on whom she makes her fullest impressions that can penetrate her shrine or unveil her Holy of Holies. It is only those whom she has filled with her spirit that have the boldness or the power to reveal her mysteries to others.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Contributed by: Zaady

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