disaster

A Quote by Rachel Louise Carson on disaster, earth, poem, robert frost, and superhighway

We stand now where two roads diverge. But unlike the roads in Robert Frost's familiar poem, they are not equally fair. The road we have long been traveling is deceptively easy, a smooth superhighway on which we progress with great speed, but at its end lies disaster. The other fork of the road—the one "less traveled by"—offers our last, our only chance to reach a destination that assures the preservation of the earth.

Rachel Carson (1907 - 1964)

Contributed by: ~Matthew

A Quote by Chuck Palahnuik on disaster and resurrected

Only after disaster can we be resurrected.

Chuck Palahnuik

Contributed by: Mavis

A Quote by Sol Luckman on disaster, consequences, carelessness, and responsibility

I suppose I brought disaster on myself—though if anyone had bothered to warn me of the dire consequences of my actions, I never would have been so careless.

Sol Luckman

Source: Beginner's Luke: Book I of the Beginner's Luke Series, Pages: 49

Contributed by: Leigh

A Quote by Walter Russell on wealth, business, money, balance, universe, nationality, universal, law, goodwill, love, world, personal, relationship, disaster, and might

In the business world, unwise men take more that they give. They do not realize that they are breaking the Universal Law which will eventually break them to an equal extent. It may not be balanced in the form of dollars and cents but in the loss of good-will upon which their future business depends.
Man’s ignorance of the Law of Love in personal and world relationships will not serve as an excuse to save him from disaster. Wealth cannot be acquired from others by might, for wealth thus taken will impoverish him who takes anything which is not given. Nor can power be thus acquired, for the weakness of the despoiled will prevail against the might of the despoiler.
Everywhere in the world this law is seen working out its inexorable certainty. Empires built by might are dissolving. Rich world treasuries are disgorging their gold and piling up debt. The blood of every man killed by the sword has been paid for by ten – perchance ten times ten – of those who killed. Nations which have fattened on the food taken from others are starving amid the ruins of palaces in which they feasted.
A new world – one world – cannot grow out of a universe built on the foundations of hate and fear by unbalanced taking.
A new world must have new foundations. An eternal foundation is not built as one whole – it is built lovingly stone by stone. Thus must man rebuild his world.

Walter Russell

Source: The Message of the Divine Iliad (Vol. 1) (Divine Iliad)

Contributed by: esaruoho

A Quote by Rudyard Kipling on courage, dreaming, hate, forgiveness, trust, truth, patience, lies, triumph, disaster, and perseverance

If you can keep your head when all about you
   Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
   But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
   Or being lied about, don't deal in lies,
Or being hated, don't give way to hating,
   And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise:

If you can dream -- and not make dreams your master;
   If you can think -- and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
   And treat those two imposters just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
   Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
   And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools:

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
   And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
   And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
   To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
   Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!"

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
   Or walk with Kings -- nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
   If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
   With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
   And -- which is more -- you'll be a Man, my son!

Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)

Source: "If," poem written 1895; first published in Rewards and Fairies, 1910

Contributed by: CajunGypsy

A Quote by MaNnUzZ on desire, guilt, discontentment, disaster, and greed

There is no calamity greater than lavish desires.
There is no greater guilt than discontentment.
And there is no greater disaster than greed.

Mandy

Source: lao tze

Contributed by: MaNnUzZ

A Quote by Yehuda L. Bialer on children, death, deed, disaster, eternity, generations, heart, holocaust, people, silence, sons, spirit, and tyranny

Son of man, keep not silent, forget not deeds of tyranny. Cry out at the disaster of a people, recount it unto your children and they unto theirs. From generation to generation the hordes swept in, ran wild and savage and there was no deliverance, valiance, and revolt. How the mighty are fallen, the great in spirit and stout of heart, walking to their death with a halo of eternity. (reference to the Holocaust)

Yehuda L. Bialer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on disaster, men, success, and world

There are men in the world who derive an exaltation from the proximity of disaster and ruin, as other from success.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: The Malakand Field Force, 1898

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on disaster and guilt

We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villians by compulsion.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Lear

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on art, beauty, birds, change, day, disaster, painting, peace, quiet, and water

Two amateur artists were asked to paint something depicting "peace." On the appointed day, both artists brought their paintings to be shown. One picture was of a quiet, rippleless lake. Here indeed was peace as seen by an artist. The other painting showed a gnarled tree standing on the precipice in a rugged canyon. Nearby was a thundering waterfall, and the river dashed on, angrily below. In the tree, near her nest, a bird was perched, singing above the clamor of the torrent of the water below. A sudden change in the wind could bring disaster to the frail limb upon which the bird and her nest were located. But instinctively she knew that if that happened, she and her young ones could use their wings and mount to the sky. Yes, the two artists had fulfilled what they had been asked to do. One painted a scene depicting the quiet beauty of peace. The other had seen the majestic splendor that accompanies inner peace.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

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